Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pediatr Diabetes. 2009 Apr;10(2):116-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-5448.2008.00449.x. Epub 2009 Jan 7.

Use of a subcutaneous injection port to improve glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if use of an injection port, the Insuflon, would help to improve glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes (TID) who were in suboptimal glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c >8.0%).

STUDY DESIGN:

A three-arm randomized protocol was used to study the effects of the Insuflon (a subcutaneous injection port) vs. an alarmable blood glucose meter vs. a control group on glycemic control in 66 youth with T1D. All participants used insulin glargine as their basal insulin and the NovoPen Junior with insulin aspart as their rapid-acting insulin. Participants were randomized into control, alarm, or Insuflon groups. HbA1c levels were the primary outcome with values at baseline, 3, and 6 months.

RESULTS:

Initial parameters were similar in the three groups. HbA1c values were significantly lower for youth who used the Insuflon than for the control group at 3 and 6 months (p = 0.025). The HbA1c values (in %) for youth using the Insuflon decreased significantly from 9.4 at screening to 8.7 at 3 months (p < 0.001) and 8.5 at 6 months (p < 0.001). There were no significant reductions (p > or = 0.05) in the HbA1c values within the other two groups.

CONCLUSION:

The Insuflon injection port helps some youth with T1D to improve glycemic control.

PMID:
19175512
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Blackwell Publishing
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk