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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008 Jul;122(1):62-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2008.04.022. Epub 2008 Jun 5.

Defective killing of Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis is associated with reduced mobilization of human beta-defensin-3.

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  • 1Division of Allergy/Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, Colo 80206, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD) have frequent colonization and infection with Staphylococcus aureus. Rapid elimination of S. aureus depends on constitutive synthesis and mobilization of human beta-defensin-3 (HBD-3).

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether keratinocytes in AD, compared with normal, skin are less able to kill S. aureus rapidly, and to assess the potential role that abnormally low mobilization of HBD-3 onto S. aureus has in this process.

METHODS:

Skin samples from 10 normal individuals and 10 patients with AD were compared for synthesis and mobilization of HBD-3 onto surface-associated S. aureus. Furthermore, keratinocytes from 10 individuals were studied for the effects of T(H)2 cytokines on the ability of the cells to synthesize and mobilize HBD-3, and to kill S. aureus.

RESULTS:

Keratinocytes in skin biopsies from subjects with AD were defective in killing S. aureus relative to normal individuals (P < .001). The constitutive levels of HBD-3 in the epidermal keratinocytes were similar between normal individuals and those with AD. However, the cells of patients with AD were unable to mobilize HBD-3 efficiently to kill S. aureus. Physiologic Ca(++) was essential for development of normal HBD-3 levels by cultured human keratinocytes. Mobilization of HBD-3 and the ability to kill S. aureus were significantly (P < .05) inhibited by IL-4 and IL-13. Antagonism of IL-4/10/13 with antibodies significantly (P < .01) improved mobilization of HBD-3 onto the surface of S. aureus by skin from patients with AD.

CONCLUSION:

Patients with AD have problems with S. aureus skin infection. This is a result of increased levels of T(H)2 cytokines, which inhibit keratinocyte mobilization of HBD-3.

PMID:
18538383
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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