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Phys Ther. 2008 Apr;88(4):462-70. doi: 10.2522/ptj.20070027. Epub 2008 Jan 24.

Effects of whole-body vibration exercise on lower-extremity muscle strength and power in an older population: a randomized clinical trial.

Author information

  • 1School of Leisure, Sport and Tourism, University of Technology, Sydney (Kuring-gai Campus), PO Box 222, Lindfield, NSW, 2070, Australia. sven.rees@uts.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Vibration training is a relatively new exercise intervention. This study investigated the effects of vibration exercise on strength (force-producing capacity) and power in older adults who are healthy.

PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS:

Thirty participants (mean age=73.7 years, SD=4.6) were randomly assigned to a vibration exercise training (VIB) group or an exercise without vibration training (EX) group. The interventions consisted of 3 sessions per week for 8 weeks. Outcome measures included isokinetic flexor and extensor strength and power of the hip, knee, and ankle.

RESULTS:

The VIB group significantly improved ankle plantar flexor strength and power compared with the EX group. However, there were no significant differences between the VIB and EX groups for knee flexor or extensor strength.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION:

Vibration training contributed to an increase in plantar flexor strength and power. However, the strength gains for the knee and hip flexors and extensors for the VIB group and the EX group were comparable. Future vibration protocols should explore different body positions to target muscles higher up on the leg.

PMID:
18218826
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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