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Brain Inj. 2004 Oct;18(10):997-1016.

Memory self-awareness and memory self-monitoring following severe closed-head injury.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4820, USA. schmitter-e@wsu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the accuracy of memory self-awareness and memory self-monitoring abilities in participants with severe closed-head injury (CHI).

DESIGN AND METHODS:

A performance-prediction paradigm was used to evaluate meta-memory abilities in 31 participants with severe CHI (>1 year post-injury) and 31 controls. To assess memory self-awareness, before completing story recall, visual reproduction and list learning memory tasks, participants predicted the amount of information they would remember for each task. Memory self-monitoring was evaluated by examining participants' ability to increase the accuracy of their predictions following experience with each memory task.

RESULTS:

Although participants with CHI exhibited poorer recall than controls, they were equally aware of how differing task demands influence recall. They also successfully modified their predictions following task exposure.

CONCLUSIONS:

Meta-memory was better preserved than actual memory performance. It may be possible to build on meta-memory skills to help patients with CHI more consistently use strategies that aid memory performance.

PMID:
15370899
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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