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Phys Ther. 2003 Oct;83(10):888-98.

Establishing minimal clinically important differences for scores on the pediatric evaluation of disability inventory for inpatient rehabilitation.

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  • 1Warbasse Nursery School, Brooklyn, NY, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Standardized pediatric assessment tools such as the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) numerically quantify changes during rehabilitation through test scores, but they are unable to provide client-specific information regarding important changes in function. The purpose of this study was to identify the smallest change in PEDI scores during inpatient rehabilitation that was considered to be a minimal clinically important difference (MCID) by physical therapists and other clinicians.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

A retrospective review was done of the medical charts of 53 children and youth (1-19 years of age) discharged from an inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Fifteen clinicians (5 physical therapists, 6 occupational therapists, and 4 speech and language pathologists) who were masked to the PEDI scores provided ratings of the magnitude of functional changes during inpatient rehabilitation using a Likert scale and a visual analog scale (VAS). Ratings by clinicians were reduced to 4 categories, including the MCID, and compared with PEDI change scores.

RESULTS:

The MCIDs ranged from 6 to 15 points (X=11.5, 95% confidence interval= +/- 2.8) for all PEDI scales. Likert scale and VAS ratings were correlated (tau =.73-.80).

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION:

Across all scales, PEDI change scores on the order of about 11% (0-100 scale) appear to be meaningful to clinicians during a child's or adolescent's inpatient rehabilitation. These data can serve as a starting point for interpreting group and individual changes on the PEDI during physical therapy intervention in inpatient rehabilitation.

PMID:
14519060
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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