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Transfusion. 2000 Aug;40(8):961-7.

In vitro collection and posttransfusion engraftment characteristics of MNCs obtained by using a new separator for autologous PBPC transplantation.

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  • 1Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. edward.snyder@yale.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A clinical study was performed to evaluate the peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) collection, transfusion, and engraftment characteristics associated with use of a blood cell separator (Amicus, Baxter Healthcare).

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS:

Oncology patients (n = 31) scheduled for an autologous PBPC transplant following myeloablative therapy were studied. PBPCs were mobilized by a variety of chemotherapeutic regimens and the use of G-CSF. As no prior studies evaluated whether PBPCs collected on the Amicus separator would be viable after transfusion, to ensure patient safety, PBPCs were first collected on another cell separator (CS-3000 Plus, Baxter) and stored as backup. The day after the CS-3000 Plus collections were completed, PBPC collections intended for transfusion were performed using the Amicus instrument. For each transplant, >2.5 x 10(6) CD34+ PBPCs per kg of body weight were transfused.

RESULTS:

Clinical data collected on the donors immediately before and after PBPC collection with the Amicus device were comparable to donor data similarly obtained for the CS-3000 Plus collections. While the number of CD34+ cells and the RBC volume in the collected products were equivalent for the two devices, the platelet content of the Amicus collections was significantly lower than that of the CS-3000 Plus collections (4.35 x 10(10) platelets/bag vs. 6.61 x 10(10) platelets/bag, p<0.05). Collection efficiencies for CD34+ cells were 64 +/- 23 percent for the Amicus device and 43 +/- 14 percent for the CS-3000 Plus device (p<0.05). The mean time to engraftment for cells collected via the Amicus device was 8.7 +/- 0.7 days for >500 PMNs per microL and 9.7 +/- 1.5 days to attain a platelet count of >20,000 per microL-equivalent to data in the literature. No CS-3000 Plus backup cells were transfused and no serious adverse events attributable to the Amicus device were encountered.

CONCLUSIONS:

The mean Amicus CD34+ cell collection efficiency was better (p<0.05) than that of the CS-3000 Plus collection. Short-term engraftment was durable. The PBPCs collected with the Amicus separator are safe and effective for use for autologous transplant patients requiring PBPC rescue from high-dose myeloablative chemotherapy.

PMID:
10960524
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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