Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ethn Dis. 2010 Autumn;20(4):458-62.

Perceived cancer risk among American Indians: implications for intervention research.

Author information

  • 1Department of Development Sociology, Cornell University, 322 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. aag27@cornell.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Perceived risk of disease plays a key role in health behaviors, making it an important issue for cancer-prevention research. We investigate associations between perceived cancer risk and selected cancer risk factors in a population-based sample of American Indians. STUDY DESIGN AND POPULATION: Data for this cross-sectional study come from a random sample of 182 American Indian adults, aged > or = 40 years, residing on the Hopi Reservation in northeastern Arizona.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Perception of cancer risk was ascertained with the 5-point Likert scale question, "How likely do you think it is that you will develop cancer in the future?" dichotomized into low perceived risk and high perceived risk.

RESULTS:

Participants reporting a family member with cancer were more likely, by greater than five times, to report the perception that they would get cancer (OR = 5.3; 95% CI: 2.3, 12.3). After controlling for age and family history of cancer, knowledge of cancer risk factors and attitude about cancer prevention were not significantly associated with risk perception.

CONCLUSIONS:

Perceived cancer risk was significantly associated with self-reported family history of cancer, supporting the importance of personal knowledge of cancer among American Indians. Further research is needed to obtain a more complete picture of the factors associated with perceptions of cancer risk among American Indians in order to develop effective interventions.

PMID:
21305837
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk