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Items: 8

1.

Hyperpolarized 89Y complexes as pH sensitive NMR probes.

Jindal AK, Merritt ME, Suh EH, Malloy CR, Sherry AD, Kovács Z.

J Am Chem Soc. 2010 Feb 17;132(6):1784-5. doi: 10.1021/ja910278e.

2.

Hyperpolarized NMR probes for biological assays.

Meier S, Jensen PR, Karlsson M, Lerche MH.

Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jan 16;14(1):1576-97. doi: 10.3390/s140101576. Review.

3.

Overcoming the concentration-dependence of responsive probes for magnetic resonance imaging.

Ekanger LA, Allen MJ.

Metallomics. 2015 Mar;7(3):405-21. doi: 10.1039/c4mt00289j. Review.

4.

Applications of luminescent inorganic and organometallic transition metal complexes as biomolecular and cellular probes.

Lo KK, Choi AW, Law WH.

Dalton Trans. 2012 May 28;41(20):6021-47. doi: 10.1039/c2dt11892k. Epub 2012 Jan 13. Review.

PMID:
22241514
5.

Chemistry of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy pH responsive contrast agents.

Pérez-Mayoral E, Negri V, Soler-Padrós J, Cerdán S, Ballesteros P.

Eur J Radiol. 2008 Sep;67(3):453-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ejrad.2008.02.048. Epub 2008 May 1. Review.

PMID:
18455343
6.

NMR of hyperpolarised probes.

Witte C, Schröder L.

NMR Biomed. 2013 Jul;26(7):788-802. doi: 10.1002/nbm.2873. Epub 2012 Oct 3. Review.

PMID:
23033215
7.

Paramagnetic lanthanide complexes as PARACEST agents for medical imaging.

Woods M, Woessner DE, Sherry AD.

Chem Soc Rev. 2006 Jun;35(6):500-11. Epub 2006 May 10. Review.

8.

Environmentally sensitive paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

Pacheco-Torres J, Calle D, Lizarbe B, Negri V, Ubide C, Fayos R, Larrubia PL, Ballesteros P, Cerdan S.

Curr Top Med Chem. 2011;11(1):115-30. Review.

PMID:
20809891
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