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Items: 1 to 20 of 133

1.
2.

The effect of eye closure on protein and complement deposition on Group IV hydrogel contact lenses: relationship to tear flow dynamics.

Sack RA, Sathe S, Hackworth LA, Willcox MD, Holden BA, Morris CA.

Curr Eye Res. 1996 Nov;15(11):1092-100.

PMID:
8950503
3.

Lysozyme sorption in hydrogel contact lenses.

Garrett Q, Garrett RW, Milthorpe BK.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 1999 Apr;40(5):897-903.

PMID:
10102286
4.

Localization of lysozyme sorption to conventional and silicone hydrogel contact lenses using confocal microscopy.

Luensmann D, Zhang F, Subbaraman L, Sheardown H, Jones L.

Curr Eye Res. 2009 Aug;34(8):683-97.

PMID:
19899996
5.

Clinical comparison of Omafilcon A with four control materials.

Young G, Bowers R, Hall B, Port M.

CLAO J. 1997 Oct;23(4):249-58.

PMID:
9348449
6.

Care regimen and lens material influence on silicone hydrogel contact lens deposition.

Zhao Z, Carnt NA, Aliwarga Y, Wei X, Naduvilath T, Garrett Q, Korth J, Willcox MD.

Optom Vis Sci. 2009 Mar;86(3):251-9. doi: 10.1097/OPX.0b013e318196a74b.

PMID:
19165125
7.

Confocal microscopy and albumin penetration into contact lenses.

Luensmann D, Glasier MA, Zhang F, Bantseev V, Simpson T, Jones L.

Optom Vis Sci. 2007 Sep;84(9):839-47.

PMID:
17873769
8.

Deposition of lipid, protein, and secretory phospholipase A2 on hydrophilic contact lenses.

Mochizuki H, Yamada M, Hatou S, Kawashima M, Hata S.

Eye Contact Lens. 2008 Jan;34(1):46-9. doi: 10.1097/ICL.0b013e3180676d5d.

PMID:
18180684
9.

Protein deposition on a lathe-cut silicone hydrogel contact lens material.

Subbaraman LN, Woods J, Teichroeb JH, Jones L.

Optom Vis Sci. 2009 Mar;86(3):244-50. doi: 10.1097/OPX.0b013e3181981b54.

PMID:
19252421
10.

Quantity of protein deposited on hydrogel contact lenses and its relation to visible protein deposits.

Myers RI, Larsen DW, Tsao M, Castellano C, Becherer LD, Fontana F, Ghormley NR, Meier G.

Optom Vis Sci. 1991 Oct;68(10):776-82.

PMID:
1749595
11.

Lipid and protein deposition of N-vinyl pyrrolidone-containing group II and group IV frequent replacement contact lenses.

Jones L, Evans K, Sariri R, Franklin V, Tighe B.

CLAO J. 1997 Apr;23(2):122-6.

PMID:
9108978
12.

Two-laser dual-immunofluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy using Cy2- and Cy5-conjugated secondary antibodies: unequivocal detection of co-localization of neuronal markers.

Wouterlood FG, Van Denderen JC, Blijleven N, Van Minnen J, Härtig W.

Brain Res Brain Res Protoc. 1998 Jan;2(2):149-59.

PMID:
9473644
13.

Initial in vivo tear protein deposition on individual hydrogel contact lenses.

Leahy CD, Mandell RB, Lin ST.

Optom Vis Sci. 1990 Jul;67(7):504-11.

PMID:
2205814
14.
16.

Six month clinical evaluation of a biomimetic hydrogel contact lens.

Young G, Bowers R, Hall B, Port M.

CLAO J. 1997 Oct;23(4):226-36.

PMID:
9348446
17.
18.

Influence of contact lens material surface characteristics and replacement frequency on protein and lipid deposition.

Maïssa C, Franklin V, Guillon M, Tighe B.

Optom Vis Sci. 1998 Sep;75(9):697-705.

PMID:
9778704
19.

Specificity and biological activity of the protein deposited on the hydrogel surface. Relationship of polymer structure to biofilm formation.

Sack RA, Jones B, Antignani A, Libow R, Harvey H.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 1987 May;28(5):842-9.

PMID:
3570694
20.

Effect of patient wear and extent of protein deposition on adsorption of Acanthamoeba to five types of hydrogel contact lenses.

Simmons PA, Tomlinson A, Connor R, Hay J, Seal DV.

Optom Vis Sci. 1996 Jun;73(6):362-8.

PMID:
8807646
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