Format
Items per page
Sort by

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from

Items: 1 to 20 of 93

1.

Cancer chemoprevention: current state of the art.

Landis-Piwowar KR, Iyer NR.

Cancer Growth Metastasis. 2014 Jun 10;7:19-25. doi: 10.4137/CGM.S11288. eCollection 2014. Review.

2.

Phytochemicals: cancer chemoprevention and suppression of tumor onset and metastasis.

Shu L, Cheung KL, Khor TO, Chen C, Kong AN.

Cancer Metastasis Rev. 2010 Sep;29(3):483-502. doi: 10.1007/s10555-010-9239-y. Review.

PMID:
20798979
3.

Molecular pathways for cancer chemoprevention by dietary phytochemicals.

Tan AC, Konczak I, Sze DM, Ramzan I.

Nutr Cancer. 2011;63(4):495-505. doi: 10.1080/01635581.2011.538953. Review.

PMID:
21500099
4.

Terpenoids and breast cancer chemoprevention.

Rabi T, Bishayee A.

Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2009 May;115(2):223-39. doi: 10.1007/s10549-008-0118-y. Epub 2008 Jul 19. Review.

PMID:
18636327
5.

Molecular basis of traditional Chinese medicine in cancer chemoprevention.

Wang S, Penchala S, Prabhu S, Wang J, Huang Y.

Curr Drug Discov Technol. 2010 Mar;7(1):67-75. Review.

PMID:
20226002
6.

Targeting specific cell signaling transduction pathways by dietary and medicinal phytochemicals in cancer chemoprevention.

Neergheen VS, Bahorun T, Taylor EW, Jen LS, Aruoma OI.

Toxicology. 2010 Dec 5;278(2):229-41. doi: 10.1016/j.tox.2009.10.010. Epub 2009 Oct 20. Review.

PMID:
19850100
7.

Primary prevention: phytoprevention and chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

Turini ME, DuBois RN.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am. 2002 Aug;16(4):811-40. Review.

PMID:
12418050
8.

Cancer chemoprevention with dietary isothiocyanates mature for clinical translational research.

Singh SV, Singh K.

Carcinogenesis. 2012 Oct;33(10):1833-42. doi: 10.1093/carcin/bgs216. Epub 2012 Jun 27. Review.

9.
10.

Understanding the molecular mechanisms of cancer prevention by dietary phytochemicals: From experimental models to clinical trials.

Maru GB, Hudlikar RR, Kumar G, Gandhi K, Mahimkar MB.

World J Biol Chem. 2016 Feb 26;7(1):88-99. doi: 10.4331/wjbc.v7.i1.88. Review.

11.

Multiple molecular targets in cancer chemoprevention by curcumin.

Thangapazham RL, Sharma A, Maheshwari RK.

AAPS J. 2006 Jul 7;8(3):E443-9. Review.

12.

Molecular basis of chemoprevention by resveratrol: NF-kappaB and AP-1 as potential targets.

Kundu JK, Surh YJ.

Mutat Res. 2004 Nov 2;555(1-2):65-80. Review.

PMID:
15476852
13.

Cancer chemoprevention with dietary phytochemicals.

Surh YJ.

Nat Rev Cancer. 2003 Oct;3(10):768-80. Review.

PMID:
14570043
14.

Gap junctions as targets for cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy.

Trosko JE, Ruch RJ.

Curr Drug Targets. 2002 Dec;3(6):465-82. Review.

PMID:
12448698
15.
16.

Blocking and suppressing mechanisms of chemoprevention by dietary constituents.

Manson MM, Gescher A, Hudson EA, Plummer SM, Squires MS, Prigent SA.

Toxicol Lett. 2000 Mar 15;112-113:499-505. Review.

PMID:
10720772
17.

New Enlightenment of Skin Cancer Chemoprevention through Phytochemicals: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies and the Underlying Mechanisms.

Singh M, Suman S, Shukla Y.

Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:243452. doi: 10.1155/2014/243452. Epub 2014 Mar 17. Review.

18.

Perspectives in cancer chemoprevention.

Stoner GD, Morse MA, Kelloff GJ.

Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Jun;105 Suppl 4:945-54. Review.

19.

Vitamins, phytochemicals, diets, and their implementation in cancer chemoprevention.

Lee KW, Lee HJ, Lee CY.

Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2004;44(6):437-52.

PMID:
15615427
20.

Cancer chemoprevention by phytochemicals: potential molecular targets, biomarkers and animal models.

Kwon KH, Barve A, Yu S, Huang MT, Kong AN.

Acta Pharmacol Sin. 2007 Sep;28(9):1409-21. Review.

Format
Items per page
Sort by

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Write to the Help Desk