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Results: 1 to 20 of 99

1.

Early life stress disrupts social behavior and prefrontal cortex parvalbumin interneurons at an earlier time-point in females than in males.

Holland FH, Ganguly P, Potter DN, Chartoff EH, Brenhouse HC.

Neurosci Lett. 2014 Apr 30;566:131-6. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2014.02.023. Epub 2014 Feb 22.

PMID:
24565933
[PubMed - in process]
2.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory treatment prevents delayed effects of early life stress in rats.

Brenhouse HC, Andersen SL.

Biol Psychiatry. 2011 Sep 1;70(5):434-40. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2011.05.006. Epub 2011 Jun 16.

PMID:
21679927
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
3.

Early life stress and sex-specific sensitivity of the catecholaminergic systems in prefrontal and limbic regions of Octodon degus.

Kunzler J, Braun K, Bock J.

Brain Struct Funct. 2013 Dec 17. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
24343570
[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
4.

Evidence for a neuroinflammatory mechanism in delayed effects of early life adversity in rats: relationship to cortical NMDA receptor expression.

Wieck A, Andersen SL, Brenhouse HC.

Brain Behav Immun. 2013 Feb;28:218-26. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2012.11.012. Epub 2012 Dec 1.

PMID:
23207107
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
5.

Impact of early-life stress on the medial prefrontal cortex functions - a search for the pathomechanisms of anxiety and mood disorders.

Chocyk A, Majcher-Maślanka I, Dudys D, Przyborowska A, Wędzony K.

Pharmacol Rep. 2013;65(6):1462-70.

PMID:
24552993
[PubMed - in process]
Free Article
6.

Early life stress modulates amygdala-prefrontal functional connectivity: Implications for oxytocin effects.

Fan Y, Herrera-Melendez AL, Pestke K, Feeser M, Aust S, Otte C, Pruessner JC, Böker H, Bajbouj M, Grimm S.

Hum Brain Mapp. 2014 May 26. doi: 10.1002/hbm.22553. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
24862297
[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
7.

Imbalance of immunohistochemically characterized interneuron populations in the adolescent and adult rodent medial prefrontal cortex after repeated exposure to neonatal separation stress.

Helmeke C, Ovtscharoff W Jr, Poeggel G, Braun K.

Neuroscience. 2008 Mar 3;152(1):18-28. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2007.12.023.

PMID:
18258373
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
8.

Sex-dependent effects of an early life treatment in rats that increases maternal care: vulnerability or resilience?

Fuentes S, Daviu N, Gagliano H, Garrido P, Zelena D, Monasterio N, Armario A, Nadal R.

Front Behav Neurosci. 2014 Feb 25;8:56. doi: 10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00056. eCollection 2014.

PMID:
24616673
[PubMed]
Free PMC Article
9.

Primate early life stress leads to long-term mild hippocampal decreases in corticosteroid receptor expression.

Arabadzisz D, Diaz-Heijtz R, Knuesel I, Weber E, Pilloud S, Dettling AC, Feldon J, Law AJ, Harrison PJ, Pryce CR.

Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Jun 1;67(11):1106-9. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.12.016. Epub 2010 Feb 4.

PMID:
20132928
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
10.

Early-life stress affects the structural and functional plasticity of the medial prefrontal cortex in adolescent rats.

Chocyk A, Bobula B, Dudys D, Przyborowska A, Majcher-Maślanka I, Hess G, Wędzony K.

Eur J Neurosci. 2013 Jul;38(1):2089-107. doi: 10.1111/ejn.12208. Epub 2013 Apr 15.

PMID:
23581639
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
11.

Males, but not females, lose tyrosine hydroxylase fibers in the medial prefrontal cortex and are impaired on a delayed alternation task during aging.

Chisholm NC, Kim T, Juraska JM.

Behav Brain Res. 2013 Apr 15;243:239-46. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2013.01.009. Epub 2013 Jan 15.

PMID:
23327742
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
13.

Differential functional connectivity within an emotion regulation neural network among individuals resilient and susceptible to the depressogenic effects of early life stress.

Cisler JM, James GA, Tripathi S, Mletzko T, Heim C, Hu XP, Mayberg HS, Nemeroff CB, Kilts CD.

Psychol Med. 2013 Mar;43(3):507-18. doi: 10.1017/S0033291712001390. Epub 2012 Jul 10.

PMID:
22781311
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
14.

Interactions between BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and early life stress predict brain and arousal pathways to syndromal depression and anxiety.

Gatt JM, Nemeroff CB, Dobson-Stone C, Paul RH, Bryant RA, Schofield PR, Gordon E, Kemp AH, Williams LM.

Mol Psychiatry. 2009 Jul;14(7):681-95. doi: 10.1038/mp.2008.143. Epub 2009 Jan 20.

PMID:
19153574
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
15.

Effects of early life stress on cognitive and affective function: an integrated review of human literature.

Pechtel P, Pizzagalli DA.

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2011 Mar;214(1):55-70. doi: 10.1007/s00213-010-2009-2. Epub 2010 Sep 24. Review.

PMID:
20865251
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
16.

Periadolescent maturation of the prefrontal cortex is sex-specific and is disrupted by prenatal stress.

Markham JA, Mullins SE, Koenig JI.

J Comp Neurol. 2013 Jun 1;521(8):1828-43. doi: 10.1002/cne.23262.

PMID:
23172080
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
17.

Early-life seizures produce lasting alterations in the structure and function of the prefrontal cortex.

Kleen JK, Sesqué A, Wu EX, Miller FA, Hernan AE, Holmes GL, Scott RC.

Epilepsy Behav. 2011 Oct;22(2):214-9. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2011.07.022. Epub 2011 Aug 27.

PMID:
21873119
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
18.

Early life stress impacts dorsolateral prefrontal cortex functional connectivity in healthy adults: informing future studies of antidepressant treatments.

Philip NS, Valentine TR, Sweet LH, Tyrka AR, Price LH, Carpenter LL.

J Psychiatr Res. 2014 May;52:63-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.01.014. Epub 2014 Jan 29.

PMID:
24513500
[PubMed - in process]
19.

Decreased default network connectivity is associated with early life stress in medication-free healthy adults.

Philip NS, Sweet LH, Tyrka AR, Price LH, Bloom RF, Carpenter LL.

Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2013 Jan;23(1):24-32. doi: 10.1016/j.euroneuro.2012.10.008. Epub 2012 Nov 8.

PMID:
23141153
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
20.

Adolescent female rats are more resistant than males to the effects of early stress on prefrontal cortex and impulsive behavior.

Spivey JM, Shumake J, Colorado RA, Conejo-Jimenez N, Gonzalez-Pardo H, Gonzalez-Lima F.

Dev Psychobiol. 2009 Apr;51(3):277-88. doi: 10.1002/dev.20362.

PMID:
19125421
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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