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Similar articles for PubMed (Select 24448274)

1.

Meta-analysis of D-values of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum and its surrogate strain Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679.

Diao MM, André S, Membré JM.

Int J Food Microbiol. 2014 Mar 17;174:23-30. doi: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2013.12.029. Epub 2014 Jan 7.

PMID:
24448274
2.

Combined high pressure and thermal processing on inactivation of type A and proteolytic type B spores of Clostridium botulinum.

Reddy NR, Marshall KM, Morrissey TR, Loeza V, Patazca E, Skinner GE, Krishnamurthy K, Larkin JW.

J Food Prot. 2013 Aug;76(8):1384-92. doi: 10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-12-538.

PMID:
23905794
3.

Synergistic inactivation of spores of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum strains by high pressure and heat is strain and product dependent.

Bull MK, Olivier SA, van Diepenbeek RJ, Kormelink F, Chapman B.

Appl Environ Microbiol. 2009 Jan;75(2):434-45. doi: 10.1128/AEM.01426-08. Epub 2008 Nov 14.

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5.

Effect of thermal treatments in oils on bacterial spore survival.

Ababouch L, Busta FF.

J Appl Bacteriol. 1987 Jun;62(6):491-502.

PMID:
3114210
6.

Combined effects of heat, nisin and acidification on the inactivation of Clostridium sporogenes spores in carrot-alginate particles: from kinetics to process validation.

Naim F, Zareifard MR, Zhu S, Huizing RH, Grabowski S, Marcotte M.

Food Microbiol. 2008 Oct;25(7):936-41. doi: 10.1016/j.fm.2008.06.005. Epub 2008 Jun 11.

PMID:
18721685
7.
8.

Comparison of viability and heat resistance of Clostridium sporogenes stored at different temperatures.

Mah JH, Kang DH, Tang J.

J Food Sci. 2009 Jan-Feb;74(1):M23-7. doi: 10.1111/j.1750-3841.2008.00984.x.

PMID:
19200102
11.

Effects of minerals on sporulation and heat resistance of Clostridium sporogenes.

Mah JH, Kang DH, Tang J.

Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Dec 10;128(2):385-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2008.10.002. Epub 2008 Oct 12.

PMID:
18986726
12.
13.

Effect of pH on the heat resistance of spores comparison of two models.

Mafart P, Couvert O, Leguérinel I.

Int J Food Microbiol. 2001 Jan 22;63(1-2):51-6.

PMID:
11205953
14.

Response surface model for prediction of growth parameters from spores of Clostridium sporogenes under different experimental conditions.

Dong Q, Tu K, Guo L, Li H, Zhao Y.

Food Microbiol. 2007 Sep;24(6):624-32. Epub 2007 Jan 12.

PMID:
17418314
16.

Conditions associated with Clostridium sporogenes growth as a surrogate for Clostridium botulinum in nonthermally processed canned butter.

Taylor RH, Dunn ML, Ogden LV, Jefferies LK, Eggett DL, Steele FM.

J Dairy Sci. 2013 May;96(5):2754-64. doi: 10.3168/jds.2012-6209. Epub 2013 Mar 1.

PMID:
23453518
18.

Draft genome sequence of Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679, the common nontoxigenic surrogate for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum.

Bradbury M, Greenfield P, Midgley D, Li D, Tran-Dinh N, Vriesekoop F, Brown JL.

J Bacteriol. 2012 Mar;194(6):1631-2. doi: 10.1128/JB.06765-11.

19.

Thermal inactivation of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum type E spores in model fish media and in vacuum-packaged hot-smoked fish products.

Lindström M, Nevas M, Hielm S, Lähteenmäki L, Peck MW, Korkeala H.

Appl Environ Microbiol. 2003 Jul;69(7):4029-36.

20.
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