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Results: 1 to 20 of 115

1.

Relationship between raised BMI and sugar sweetened beverage and high fat food consumption among children.

Millar L, Rowland B, Nichols M, Swinburn B, Bennett C, Skouteris H, Allender S.

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 May;22(5):E96-103. doi: 10.1002/oby.20665. Epub 2013 Dec 9.

PMID:
24318968
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
2.

Dietary sodium intake is associated with total fluid and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in US children and adolescents aged 2-18 y: NHANES 2005-2008.

Grimes CA, Wright JD, Liu K, Nowson CA, Loria CM.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jul;98(1):189-96. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.051508. Epub 2013 May 15.

PMID:
23676421
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
3.

Foods and beverages associated with higher intake of sugar-sweetened beverages.

Mathias KC, Slining MM, Popkin BM.

Am J Prev Med. 2013 Apr;44(4):351-7. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2012.11.036.

PMID:
23498100
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
4.

Sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain in 2- to 5-year-old children.

DeBoer MD, Scharf RJ, Demmer RT.

Pediatrics. 2013 Sep;132(3):413-20. doi: 10.1542/peds.2013-0570. Epub 2013 Aug 5.

PMID:
23918897
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
5.

Dietary salt intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, and obesity risk.

Grimes CA, Riddell LJ, Campbell KJ, Nowson CA.

Pediatrics. 2013 Jan;131(1):14-21. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-1628. Epub 2012 Dec 10.

PMID:
23230077
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
6.

Demographic, socioeconomic and nutritional determinants of daily versus non-daily sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverage consumption.

Mullie P, Aerenhouts D, Clarys P.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Feb;66(2):150-5. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2011.138. Epub 2011 Aug 10.

PMID:
21829215
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
7.

Beverage intake among preschool children and its effect on weight status.

O'Connor TM, Yang SJ, Nicklas TA.

Pediatrics. 2006 Oct;118(4):e1010-8.

PMID:
17015497
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
8.

Resolved: there is sufficient scientific evidence that decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption will reduce the prevalence of obesity and obesity-related diseases.

Hu FB.

Obes Rev. 2013 Aug;14(8):606-19. doi: 10.1111/obr.12040. Epub 2013 Jun 13. Review.

PMID:
23763695
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
9.

Adolescent dietary patterns in Fiji and their relationships with standardized body mass index.

Wate JT, Snowdon W, Millar L, Nichols M, Mavoa H, Goundar R, Kama A, Swinburn B.

Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013 Apr 9;10:45. doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-10-45.

PMID:
23570554
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
10.

A trial of sugar-free or sugar-sweetened beverages and body weight in children.

de Ruyter JC, Olthof MR, Seidell JC, Katan MB.

N Engl J Med. 2012 Oct 11;367(15):1397-406. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1203034. Epub 2012 Sep 21.

PMID:
22998340
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
11.

[Simple obesity in children. A study on the role of nutritional factors].

Weker H.

Med Wieku Rozwoj. 2006 Jan-Mar;10(1):3-191. Review. Polish.

PMID:
16733288
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
12.

The relationships between sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cardiometabolic markers in young children.

Kosova EC, Auinger P, Bremer AA.

J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Feb;113(2):219-27. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2012.10.020.

PMID:
23351625
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
13.

Consumption patterns of sugar-sweetened beverages in the United States.

Han E, Powell LM.

J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Jan;113(1):43-53. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2012.09.016.

PMID:
23260723
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
14.

Secular trends in children's sweetened-beverage consumption (1973 to 1994): the Bogalusa Heart Study.

Rajeshwari R, Yang SJ, Nicklas TA, Berenson GS.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Feb;105(2):208-14.

PMID:
15668676
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
15.

Sugar-sweetened beverages and prevalence of the metabolically abnormal phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study.

Green AK, Jacques PF, Rogers G, Fox CS, Meigs JB, McKeown NM.

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 May;22(5):E157-63. doi: 10.1002/oby.20724. Epub 2014 Mar 8.

PMID:
24550031
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
16.

Prospective associations between sugar-sweetened beverage intakes and cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents.

Ambrosini GL, Oddy WH, Huang RC, Mori TA, Beilin LJ, Jebb SA.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Aug;98(2):327-34. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.051383. Epub 2013 May 29.

PMID:
23719557
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
17.

A longitudinal analysis of sugar-sweetened beverage intake in infancy and obesity at 6 years.

Pan L, Li R, Park S, Galuska DA, Sherry B, Freedman DS.

Pediatrics. 2014 Sep;134 Suppl 1:S29-35. doi: 10.1542/peds.2014-0646F.

PMID:
25183752
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
18.

Regular sugar-sweetened beverage consumption between meals increases risk of overweight among preschool-aged children.

Dubois L, Farmer A, Girard M, Peterson K.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jun;107(6):924-34; discussion 934-5.

PMID:
17524711
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
19.

Impact of change in sweetened caloric beverage consumption on energy intake among children and adolescents.

Wang YC, Ludwig DS, Sonneville K, Gortmaker SL.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Apr;163(4):336-43. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.23.

PMID:
19349562
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
20.

Exploring the relationship between sugars and obesity.

Parnell W, Wilson N, Alexander D, Wohlers M, Williden M, Mann J, Gray A.

Public Health Nutr. 2008 Aug;11(8):860-6. Epub 2007 Sep 21.

PMID:
17888201
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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