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Results: 1 to 20 of 203

1.

Surveying alcohol and other drug use through telephone sampling: a comparison of landline and mobile phone samples.

Livingston M, Dietze P, Ferris J, Pennay D, Hayes L, Lenton S.

BMC Med Res Methodol. 2013 Mar 16;13:41. doi: 10.1186/1471-2288-13-41.

PMID:
23497161
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
2.

Inclusion of mobile phone numbers into an ongoing population health survey in New South Wales, Australia: design, methods, call outcomes, costs and sample representativeness.

Barr ML, van Ritten JJ, Steel DG, Thackway SV.

BMC Med Res Methodol. 2012 Nov 22;12:177. doi: 10.1186/1471-2288-12-177.

PMID:
23173849
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
3.

Sampling and coverage issues of telephone surveys used for collecting health information in Australia: results from a face-to-face survey from 1999 to 2008.

Dal Grande E, Taylor AW.

BMC Med Res Methodol. 2010 Aug 26;10:77. doi: 10.1186/1471-2288-10-77.

PMID:
20738884
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
4.

Improving gambling survey research using dual-frame sampling of landline and mobile phone numbers.

Jackson AC, Pennay D, Dowling NA, Coles-Janess B, Christensen DR.

J Gambl Stud. 2014 Jun;30(2):291-307. doi: 10.1007/s10899-012-9353-6.

PMID:
23288431
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
5.

Growing cell-phone population and noncoverage bias in traditional random digit dial telephone health surveys.

Lee S, Brick JM, Brown ER, Grant D.

Health Serv Res. 2010 Aug;45(4):1121-39. doi: 10.1111/j.1475-6773.2010.01120.x. Epub 2010 May 24.

PMID:
20500221
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
6.

Improving public health surveillance using a dual-frame survey of landline and cell phone numbers.

Hu SS, Balluz L, Battaglia MP, Frankel MR.

Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Mar 15;173(6):703-11. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwq442. Epub 2011 Feb 22.

PMID:
21343246
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
7.

Developing a weighting strategy to include mobile phone numbers into an ongoing population health survey using an overlapping dual-frame design with limited benchmark information.

Barr ML, Ferguson RA, Hughes PJ, Steel DG.

BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014 Sep 4;14:102. doi: 10.1186/1471-2288-14-102.

PMID:
25189826
[PubMed - in process]
Free PMC Article
8.

Recruitment using mobile telephones in an Irish general population sexual health survey: challenges and practical solutions.

McBride O, Morgan K, McGee H.

BMC Med Res Methodol. 2012 Apr 4;12:45. doi: 10.1186/1471-2288-12-45.

PMID:
22475155
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
9.

Telephone coverage and health survey estimates: evaluating the need for concern about wireless substitution.

Blumberg SJ, Luke JV, Cynamon ML.

Am J Public Health. 2006 May;96(5):926-31. Epub 2006 Mar 29.

PMID:
16571707
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
10.

Reevaluating the need for concern regarding noncoverage bias in landline surveys.

Blumberg SJ, Luke JV.

Am J Public Health. 2009 Oct;99(10):1806-10. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2008.152835. Epub 2009 Aug 20.

PMID:
19696381
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
11.

[Potential selection bias in telephone surveys: landline and mobile phones].

Garcia-Continente X, Pérez-Giménez A, López MJ, Nebot M.

Gac Sanit. 2014 Mar-Apr;28(2):170-2. doi: 10.1016/j.gaceta.2013.05.010. Epub 2013 Dec 2. Spanish.

PMID:
24300381
[PubMed - in process]
Free Article
12.

The feasibility of collecting drug abuse data by telephone.

Gfroerer JC, Hughes AL.

Public Health Rep. 1991 Jul-Aug;106(4):384-93.

PMID:
1908589
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
13.

Face-to-face household interviews versus telephone interviews for health surveys.

Donovan RJ, Holman CD, Corti B, Jalleh G.

Aust N Z J Public Health. 1997 Apr;21(2):134-40.

PMID:
9161067
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
14.

A pilot study of a computer-assisted cell-phone interview (CACI) methodology to survey respondents in households without telephones about alcohol use.

Wilkins C, Casswell S, Barnes HM, Pledger M.

Drug Alcohol Rev. 2003 Jun;22(2):221-5.

PMID:
12850908
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
15.

[Role of employment or scholar status and gender: Drug use among 18 to 25 year-olds in France in 2005].

Legleye S, Beck F, Peretti-Watel P, Chau N.

Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 2008 Oct;56(5):345-55. doi: 10.1016/j.respe.2008.06.262. Epub 2008 Oct 21. French.

PMID:
18945566
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
16.

Feasibility of including cellular telephone numbers in random digit dialing for epidemiologic case-control studies.

Voigt LF, Schwartz SM, Doody DR, Lee SC, Li CI.

Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Jan 1;173(1):118-26. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwq322. Epub 2010 Nov 11.

PMID:
21071602
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
17.
18.

Mobile phones are a viable option for surveying young Australian women: a comparison of two telephone survey methods.

Liu B, Brotherton JM, Shellard D, Donovan B, Saville M, Kaldor JM.

BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011 Nov 24;11:159. doi: 10.1186/1471-2288-11-159.

PMID:
22114932
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
19.

The effect of low survey response rates on estimates of alcohol consumption in a general population survey.

Meiklejohn J, Connor J, Kypri K.

PLoS One. 2012;7(4):e35527. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0035527. Epub 2012 Apr 20.

PMID:
22532858
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
20.

Increasing cell phone usage among Hispanics: implications for telephone surveys.

Lee S, Elkasabi M, Streja L.

Am J Public Health. 2012 Jun;102(6):e19-24. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2012.300681. Epub 2012 Apr 19.

PMID:
22515863
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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