Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Similar articles for PubMed (Select 23340510)

See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eur J Hum Genet. 2013 Oct;21(10):1146-51. doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2012.295. Epub 2013 Jan 23.

Positive selection of protective variants for type 2 diabetes from the Neolithic onward: a case study in Central Asia.

Author information

  • 11] Eco-Anthropologie et Ethnobiologie, UMR 7206, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Université Paris 7 Diderot, Paris, France [2] Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Abstract

The high prevalence of type 2 diabetes and its uneven distribution among human populations is both a major public health concern and a puzzle in evolutionary biology. Why is this deleterious disease so common, while the associated genetic variants should be removed by natural selection? The 'thrifty genotype' hypothesis proposed that the causal genetic variants were advantageous and selected for during the majority of human evolution. It remains, however, unclear whether genetic data support this scenario. In this study, we characterized patterns of selection at 10 variants associated with type 2 diabetes, contrasting one herder and one farmer population from Central Asia. We aimed at identifying which alleles (risk or protective) are under selection, dating the timing of selective events, and investigating the effect of lifestyle on selective patterns. We did not find any evidence of selection on risk variants, as predicted by the thrifty genotype hypothesis. Instead, we identified clear signatures of selection on protective variants, in both populations, dating from the beginning of the Neolithic, which suggests that this major transition was accompanied by a selective advantage for non-thrifty variants. Combining our results with worldwide data further suggests that East Asia was particularly prone to such recent selection of protective haplotypes. As much effort has been devoted so far to searching for thrifty variants, we argue that more attention should be paid to the evolution of non-thrifty variants.

PMID:
23340510
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3778335
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk