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Similar articles for PubMed (Select 23113576)

1.

Double shroud delivery of silica precursor for reducing hexavalent chromium in welding fume.

Wang J, Kalivoda M, Guan J, Theodore A, Sharby J, Wu CY, Paulson K, Es-Said O.

J Occup Environ Hyg. 2012;9(12):733-42. doi: 10.1080/15459624.2012.733576.

PMID:
23113576
2.

Control of Cr6+ emissions from gas metal arc welding using a silica precursor as a shielding gas additive.

Topham N, Wang J, Kalivoda M, Huang J, Yu KM, Hsu YM, Wu CY, Oh S, Cho K, Paulson K.

Ann Occup Hyg. 2012 Mar;56(2):233-41. doi: 10.1093/annhyg/mer103. Epub 2011 Nov 21.

3.

Control of exposure to hexavalent chromium and ozone in gas metal arc welding of stainless steels by use of a secondary shield gas.

Dennis JH, French MJ, Hewitt PJ, Mortazavi SB, Redding CA.

Ann Occup Hyg. 2002 Jan;46(1):43-8.

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5.

Hexavalent chromium content in stainless steel welding fumes is dependent on the welding process and shield gas type.

Keane M, Stone S, Chen B, Slaven J, Schwegler-Berry D, Antonini J.

J Environ Monit. 2009 Feb;11(2):418-24. doi: 10.1039/b814063d. Epub 2008 Dec 18.

PMID:
19212602
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9.

Local exhaust ventilation for the control of welding fumes in the construction industry--a literature review.

Flynn MR, Susi P.

Ann Occup Hyg. 2012 Aug;56(7):764-76. doi: 10.1093/annhyg/mes018. Epub 2012 Mar 29. Review.

10.

An evaluation of welding processes to reduce hexavalent chromium exposures and reduce costs by using better welding techniques.

Keane MJ.

Environ Health Insights. 2014 Dec 17;8(Suppl 1):47-50. doi: 10.4137/EHI.S15259. eCollection 2014.

11.

Laboratory measurement of hazardous fumes and gases at a point corresponding to breathing zone of welder during a CO2 arc welding.

Saito H, Ojima J, Takaya M, Iwasaki T, Hisanaga N, Tanaka S, Arito H.

Ind Health. 2000 Jan;38(1):69-78.

12.

Levels and predictors of airborne and internal exposure to chromium and nickel among welders--results of the WELDOX study.

Weiss T, Pesch B, Lotz A, Gutwinski E, Van Gelder R, Punkenburg E, Kendzia B, Gawrych K, Lehnert M, Heinze E, Hartwig A, Käfferlein HU, Hahn JU, Brüning T; WELDOX Group.

Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2013 Mar;216(2):175-83. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2012.07.003. Epub 2012 Aug 25.

PMID:
22926021
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14.

Decreasing biotoxicity of fume particles produced in welding process.

Yu KM, Topham N, Wang J, Kalivoda M, Tseng Y, Wu CY, Lee WJ, Cho K.

J Hazard Mater. 2011 Jan 30;185(2-3):1587-91. doi: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2010.09.083. Epub 2010 Oct 1.

PMID:
21030147
15.

A novel method for assessing respiratory deposition of welding fume nanoparticles.

Cena LG, Keane MJ, Chisholm WP, Stone S, Harper M, Chen BT.

J Occup Environ Hyg. 2014;11(12):771-80. doi: 10.1080/15459624.2014.919393.

PMID:
24824154
16.

Hexavalent chromium exposures and exposure-control technologies in American enterprise: results of a NIOSH field research study.

Blade LM, Yencken MS, Wallace ME, Catalano JD, Khan A, Topmiller JL, Shulman SA, Martinez A, Crouch KG, Bennett JS.

J Occup Environ Hyg. 2007 Aug;4(8):596-618.

PMID:
17577750
17.

Sampling and analysis considerations for the determination of hexavalent chromium in workplace air.

Ashley K, Howe AM, Demange M, Nygren O.

J Environ Monit. 2003 Oct;5(5):707-16. Review.

PMID:
14587839
18.

Design, construction, and characterization of a novel robotic welding fume generator and inhalation exposure system for laboratory animals.

Antonini JM, Afshari AA, Stone S, Chen B, Schwegler-Berry D, Fletcher WG, Goldsmith WT, Vandestouwe KH, McKinney W, Castranova V, Frazer DG.

J Occup Environ Hyg. 2006 Apr;3(4):194-203; quiz D45.

PMID:
16531292
19.

Welding fumes from stainless steel gas metal arc processes contain multiple manganese chemical species.

Keane M, Stone S, Chen B.

J Environ Monit. 2010 May;12(5):1133-40.

PMID:
21491680
20.
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