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Items: 1 to 20 of 154

1.

Nesting phenology of marine turtles: insights from a regional comparative analysis on green turtle (Chelonia mydas).

Dalleau M, Ciccione S, Mortimer JA, Garnier J, Benhamou S, Bourjea J.

PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e46920. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0046920. Epub 2012 Oct 9.

2.

Chapter 2. Vulnerability of marine turtles to climate change.

Poloczanska ES, Limpus CJ, Hays GC.

Adv Mar Biol. 2009;56:151-211. doi: 10.1016/S0065-2881(09)56002-6.

PMID:
19895975
3.

The genetic structure of Australasian green turtles (Chelonia mydas): exploring the geographical scale of genetic exchange.

Dethmers KE, Broderick D, Moritz C, Fitzsimmons NN, Limpus CJ, Lavery S, Whiting S, Guinea M, Prince RI, Kennett R.

Mol Ecol. 2006 Nov;15(13):3931-46.

PMID:
17054494
4.

Changes in plasma levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline, glucose, lactate and CO2 in the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, during peak period of nesting.

Alkindi AY, Al-Habsi AA, Mahmoud IY.

Gen Comp Endocrinol. 2008 Feb 1;155(3):581-8. Epub 2007 Sep 21.

PMID:
17981280
5.

Sea turtle species vary in their susceptibility to tropical cyclones.

Pike DA, Stiner JC.

Oecologia. 2007 Aug;153(2):471-8. Epub 2007 May 4.

PMID:
17479295
6.

Dispersal and Diving Adjustments of the Green Turtle Chelonia mydas in Response to Dynamic Environmental Conditions during Post-Nesting Migration.

Chambault P, Pinaud D, Vantrepotte V, Kelle L, Entraygues M, Guinet C, Berzins R, Bilo K, Gaspar P, de Thoisy B, Le Maho Y, Chevallier D.

PLoS One. 2015 Sep 23;10(9):e0137340. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0137340. eCollection 2015.

7.

Non-migratory breeding by isolated green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the Indian Ocean: biological and conservation implications.

Whiting SD, Murray W, Macrae I, Thorn R, Chongkin M, Koch AU.

Naturwissenschaften. 2008 Apr;95(4):355-60. Epub 2007 Nov 29.

PMID:
18046497
8.

Migrations of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) between nesting and foraging grounds across the Coral Sea.

Read TC, Wantiez L, Werry JM, Farman R, Petro G, Limpus CJ.

PLoS One. 2014 Jun 18;9(6):e100083. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0100083. eCollection 2014.

9.

Trophic status drives interannual variability in nesting numbers of marine turtles.

Broderick AC, Godley BJ, Hays GC.

Proc Biol Sci. 2001 Jul 22;268(1475):1481-7.

10.

Phylogeography of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, in the Southwest Indian Ocean.

Bourjea J, Lapègue S, Gagnevin L, Broderick D, Mortimer JA, Ciccione S, Roos D, Taquet C, Grizel H.

Mol Ecol. 2007 Jan;16(1):175-86.

PMID:
17181729
11.

A comparison of the seasonal movements of tiger sharks and green turtles provides insight into their predator-prey relationship.

Fitzpatrick R, Thums M, Bell I, Meekan MG, Stevens JD, Barnett A.

PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e51927. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0051927. Epub 2012 Dec 19.

12.

Plasma steroid interactions during high-density green turtle nesting and associated disturbance.

Jessop TS, Limpus CJ, Whittier JM.

Gen Comp Endocrinol. 1999 Jul;115(1):90-100.

PMID:
10375467
13.

Plasma hormone levels in the green turtles Chelonia mydas during peak period of nesting at Ras Al-Hadd-Oman.

Al-Habsi AA, Alkindi AY, Mahmoud IY, Owens DW, Khan T, Al-Abri A.

J Endocrinol. 2006 Oct;191(1):9-14.

14.

Asynchronous emergence by loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) hatchlings.

Houghton JD, Hays GC.

Naturwissenschaften. 2001 Mar;88(3):133-6.

PMID:
11402844
15.

Fine-scale thermal adaptation in a green turtle nesting population.

Weber SB, Broderick AC, Groothuis TG, Ellick J, Godley BJ, Blount JD.

Proc Biol Sci. 2012 Mar 22;279(1731):1077-84. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2011.1238. Epub 2011 Sep 21.

16.

Annual variation in source contributions to a mixed stock: implications for quantifying connectivity.

Bjorndal KA, Bolten AB.

Mol Ecol. 2008 May;17(9):2185-93. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2008.03752.x. Epub 2008 Mar 25.

PMID:
18373532
17.
18.

Natural beaches confer fitness benefits to nesting marine turtles.

Pike DA.

Biol Lett. 2008 Dec 23;4(6):704-6. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2008.0359.

19.

Marine turtles use geomagnetic cues during open-sea homing.

Luschi P, Benhamou S, Girard C, Ciccione S, Roos D, Sudre J, Benvenuti S.

Curr Biol. 2007 Jan 23;17(2):126-33.

20.

Nesting ecology of Chelonia mydas (Testudines: Cheloniidae) on the Guanahacabibes Peninsula, Cuba.

Azanza Ricardo J, Ibarra Martín ME, González Sansón G, Abreu Grobois FA, Eckert KL, Espinosa López G, Oyama K.

Rev Biol Trop. 2013 Dec;61(4):1935-45.

PMID:
24432544
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