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Results: 1 to 20 of 186

1.

CD8+ T cells use TRAIL to restrict West Nile virus pathogenesis by controlling infection in neurons.

Shrestha B, Pinto AK, Green S, Bosch I, Diamond MS.

J Virol. 2012 Sep;86(17):8937-48. doi: 10.1128/JVI.00673-12. Epub 2012 Jun 27.

PMID:
22740407
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
2.

CD8+ T cells require perforin to clear West Nile virus from infected neurons.

Shrestha B, Samuel MA, Diamond MS.

J Virol. 2006 Jan;80(1):119-29.

PMID:
16352536
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
3.

Tumor necrosis factor alpha protects against lethal West Nile virus infection by promoting trafficking of mononuclear leukocytes into the central nervous system.

Shrestha B, Zhang B, Purtha WE, Klein RS, Diamond MS.

J Virol. 2008 Sep;82(18):8956-64. doi: 10.1128/JVI.01118-08. Epub 2008 Jul 16.

PMID:
18632856
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
4.

CD40-CD40 ligand interactions promote trafficking of CD8+ T cells into the brain and protection against West Nile virus encephalitis.

Sitati E, McCandless EE, Klein RS, Diamond MS.

J Virol. 2007 Sep;81(18):9801-11. Epub 2007 Jul 11.

PMID:
17626103
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
5.

Pattern recognition receptor MDA5 modulates CD8+ T cell-dependent clearance of West Nile virus from the central nervous system.

Lazear HM, Pinto AK, Ramos HJ, Vick SC, Shrestha B, Suthar MS, Gale M Jr, Diamond MS.

J Virol. 2013 Nov;87(21):11401-15. doi: 10.1128/JVI.01403-13. Epub 2013 Aug 21.

PMID:
23966390
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
6.

Fas ligand interactions contribute to CD8+ T-cell-mediated control of West Nile virus infection in the central nervous system.

Shrestha B, Diamond MS.

J Virol. 2007 Nov;81(21):11749-57. Epub 2007 Sep 5.

PMID:
17804505
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
7.

2'-O methylation of the viral mRNA cap by West Nile virus evades ifit1-dependent and -independent mechanisms of host restriction in vivo.

Szretter KJ, Daniels BP, Cho H, Gainey MD, Yokoyama WM, Gale M Jr, Virgin HW, Klein RS, Sen GC, Diamond MS.

PLoS Pathog. 2012;8(5):e1002698. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1002698. Epub 2012 May 10.

PMID:
22589727
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
8.
9.

CD4+ T-cell responses are required for clearance of West Nile virus from the central nervous system.

Sitati EM, Diamond MS.

J Virol. 2006 Dec;80(24):12060-9. Epub 2006 Oct 11.

PMID:
17035323
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
10.

CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune responses in West Nile virus (Sarafend strain) encephalitis are independent of gamma interferon.

Wang Y, Lobigs M, Lee E, Koskinen A, Müllbacher A.

J Gen Virol. 2006 Dec;87(Pt 12):3599-609.

PMID:
17098975
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
11.

Toll-like receptor 3 has a protective role against West Nile virus infection.

Daffis S, Samuel MA, Suthar MS, Gale M Jr, Diamond MS.

J Virol. 2008 Nov;82(21):10349-58. doi: 10.1128/JVI.00935-08. Epub 2008 Aug 20.

PMID:
18715906
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
12.

CD22 is required for protection against West Nile virus Infection.

Ma DY, Suthar MS, Kasahara S, Gale M Jr, Clark EA.

J Virol. 2013 Mar;87(6):3361-75. doi: 10.1128/JVI.02368-12. Epub 2013 Jan 9.

PMID:
23302871
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
13.

IL-1β signaling promotes CNS-intrinsic immune control of West Nile virus infection.

Ramos HJ, Lanteri MC, Blahnik G, Negash A, Suthar MS, Brassil MM, Sodhi K, Treuting PM, Busch MP, Norris PJ, Gale M Jr.

PLoS Pathog. 2012;8(11):e1003039. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1003039. Epub 2012 Nov 29.

PMID:
23209411
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
14.

Persistence of virus-specific immune responses in the central nervous system of mice after West Nile virus infection.

Stewart BS, Demarest VL, Wong SJ, Green S, Bernard KA.

BMC Immunol. 2011 Jan 20;12:6. doi: 10.1186/1471-2172-12-6.

PMID:
21251256
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
15.

CXCR3 mediates region-specific antiviral T cell trafficking within the central nervous system during West Nile virus encephalitis.

Zhang B, Chan YK, Lu B, Diamond MS, Klein RS.

J Immunol. 2008 Feb 15;180(4):2641-9.

PMID:
18250476
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
16.

Protective immune responses against West Nile virus are primed by distinct complement activation pathways.

Mehlhop E, Diamond MS.

J Exp Med. 2006 May 15;203(5):1371-81. Epub 2006 May 1.

PMID:
16651386
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
17.

CD8+ T cells mediate recovery and immunopathology in West Nile virus encephalitis.

Wang Y, Lobigs M, Lee E, Müllbacher A.

J Virol. 2003 Dec;77(24):13323-34.

PMID:
14645588
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
18.

The innate immune adaptor molecule MyD88 restricts West Nile virus replication and spread in neurons of the central nervous system.

Szretter KJ, Daffis S, Patel J, Suthar MS, Klein RS, Gale M Jr, Diamond MS.

J Virol. 2010 Dec;84(23):12125-38. doi: 10.1128/JVI.01026-10. Epub 2010 Sep 29.

PMID:
20881045
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
19.

Key role of T cell defects in age-related vulnerability to West Nile virus.

Brien JD, Uhrlaub JL, Hirsch A, Wiley CA, Nikolich-Zugich J.

J Exp Med. 2009 Nov 23;206(12):2735-45. doi: 10.1084/jem.20090222. Epub 2009 Nov 9.

PMID:
19901080
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
20.

Role of CD8+ T cells in control of West Nile virus infection.

Shrestha B, Diamond MS.

J Virol. 2004 Aug;78(15):8312-21.

PMID:
15254203
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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