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Items: 1 to 20 of 222

1.

Syntactic and morphosyntactic processing in stroke-induced and primary progressive aphasia.

Thompson CK, Meltzer-Asscher A, Cho S, Lee J, Wieneke C, Weintraub S, Mesulam MM.

Behav Neurol. 2013;26(1-2):35-54. doi: 10.3233/BEN-2012-110220.

2.

Verb and noun deficits in stroke-induced and primary progressive aphasia: The Northwestern Naming Battery().

Thompson CK, Lukic S, King MC, Mesulam MM, Weintraub S.

Aphasiology. 2012 May 1;26(5):632-655. Epub 2012 May 10.

3.
4.

The trouble with nouns and verbs in Greek fluent aphasia.

Kambanaros M.

J Commun Disord. 2008 Jan-Feb;41(1):1-19. Epub 2007 Feb 16.

PMID:
17408685
5.

Grammatical Impairments in PPA.

Thompson CK, Mack JE.

Aphasiology. 2014 Sep;28(8-9):1018-1037.

6.

Dissociations Between Fluency And Agrammatism In Primary Progressive Aphasia.

Thompson CK, Cho S, Hsu CJ, Wieneke C, Rademaker A, Weitner BB, Mesulam MM, Weintraub S.

Aphasiology. 2012;26(1):20-43.

7.

A psychometric analysis of functional category production in English agrammatic narratives.

Milman LH, Dickey MW, Thompson CK.

Brain Lang. 2008 Apr;105(1):18-31. doi: 10.1016/j.bandl.2007.12.008. Epub 2008 Feb 5.

8.

Retrieval of nouns and verbs in agrammatism and anomia.

Zingeser LB, Berndt RS.

Brain Lang. 1990 Jul;39(1):14-32.

PMID:
2207618
9.

Training verb argument structure production in agrammatic aphasia: behavioral and neural recovery patterns.

Thompson CK, Riley EA, den Ouden DB, Meltzer-Asscher A, Lukic S.

Cortex. 2013 Oct;49(9):2358-76. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2013.02.003. Epub 2013 Feb 19.

10.

Sensitivity to inflectional morphology in agrammatism: investigation of a highly inflected language.

Lukatela K, Crain S, Shankweiler D.

Brain Lang. 1988 Jan;33(1):1-15.

PMID:
3342314
11.
12.

Syntactic and semantic contributions to sentence comprehension in agrammatism.

Sherman JC, Schweickert J.

Brain Lang. 1989 Oct;37(3):419-39.

PMID:
2478253
13.

Losing track of time? Processing of time reference inflection in agrammatic and healthy speakers of German.

Bos LS, Hanne S, Wartenburger I, Bastiaanse R.

Neuropsychologia. 2014 Dec;65:180-90. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2014.10.026. Epub 2014 Oct 28.

PMID:
25447377
14.

On comprehension of active/passive sentences and language processing in a Polish agrammatic aphasic.

Jarema G, Kadzielawa D, Waite J.

Brain Lang. 1987 Nov;32(2):215-32.

PMID:
3690252
15.

Speaking of events: the case of C.M.

Tabossi P, Collina S, Caporali A, Pizzioli F, Basso A.

Cogn Neuropsychol. 2010 Mar;27(2):152-80. doi: 10.1080/02643294.2010.507945.

PMID:
20830630
16.

Phonological facilitation of object naming in agrammatic and logopenic primary progressive aphasia (PPA).

Mack JE, Cho-Reyes S, Kloet JD, Weintraub S, Mesulam MM, Thompson CK.

Cogn Neuropsychol. 2013;30(3):172-93. doi: 10.1080/02643294.2013.835717. Epub 2013 Sep 27.

17.

Understanding discourse-linked elements in aphasia: a threefold study in Russian.

Bos LS, Dragoy O, Avrutin S, Iskra E, Bastiaanse R.

Neuropsychologia. 2014 May;57:20-8. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2014.02.017. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

PMID:
24631261
18.

Verb retrieval in aphasia. 1. Characterizing single word impairments.

Berndt RS, Mitchum CC, Haendiges AN, Sandson J.

Brain Lang. 1997 Jan;56(1):68-106.

PMID:
8994699
19.

Production of non-canonical sentences in agrammatic aphasia: limits in representation or rule application?

Burchert F, Meissner N, De Bleser R.

Brain Lang. 2008 Feb;104(2):170-9. Epub 2007 Aug 8.

PMID:
17689604
20.

Grammatical comprehension deficits in non-fluent/agrammatic primary progressive aphasia.

Charles D, Olm C, Powers J, Ash S, Irwin DJ, McMillan CT, Rascovsky K, Grossman M.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2014 Mar;85(3):249-56. doi: 10.1136/jnnp-2013-305749. Epub 2013 Sep 13.

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