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Items: 1 to 20 of 158

1.

Beverage intake and obesity in Australian children.

Clifton PM, Chan L, Moss CL, Miller MD, Cobiac L.

Nutr Metab (Lond). 2011 Dec 12;8:87. doi: 10.1186/1743-7075-8-87.

2.

Beverage intake among preschool children and its effect on weight status.

O'Connor TM, Yang SJ, Nicklas TA.

Pediatrics. 2006 Oct;118(4):e1010-8.

PMID:
17015497
3.

Dietary salt intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, and obesity risk.

Grimes CA, Riddell LJ, Campbell KJ, Nowson CA.

Pediatrics. 2013 Jan;131(1):14-21. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-1628. Epub 2012 Dec 10.

4.

Consumption patterns of sugar-sweetened beverages in the United States.

Han E, Powell LM.

J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Jan;113(1):43-53. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2012.09.016.

5.

Increasing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among US adults: 1988-1994 to 1999-2004.

Bleich SN, Wang YC, Wang Y, Gortmaker SL.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jan;89(1):372-81. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2008.26883. Epub 2008 Dec 3.

6.

Sugar sweetened beverage consumption by Australian children: implications for public health strategy.

Hafekost K, Mitrou F, Lawrence D, Zubrick SR.

BMC Public Health. 2011 Dec 22;11:950. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-950.

7.

Regular sugar-sweetened beverage consumption between meals increases risk of overweight among preschool-aged children.

Dubois L, Farmer A, Girard M, Peterson K.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jun;107(6):924-34; discussion 934-5.

PMID:
17524711
9.

Sugary beverage intakes and obesity prevalence among junior high school students in Beijing - a cross-sectional research on SSBs intake.

Jia M, Wang C, Zhang Y, Zheng Y, Zhang L, Huang Y, Wang P.

Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2012;21(3):425-30.

10.

Dietary sodium intake is associated with total fluid and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in US children and adolescents aged 2-18 y: NHANES 2005-2008.

Grimes CA, Wright JD, Liu K, Nowson CA, Loria CM.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jul;98(1):189-96. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.051508. Epub 2013 May 15.

11.
12.

Secular trends in children's sweetened-beverage consumption (1973 to 1994): the Bogalusa Heart Study.

Rajeshwari R, Yang SJ, Nicklas TA, Berenson GS.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Feb;105(2):208-14.

PMID:
15668676
13.

Beverage consumption and individual-level associations in South Korea.

Han E, Kim TH, Powell LM.

BMC Public Health. 2013 Mar 6;13:195. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-195.

14.

Foods and beverages associated with higher intake of sugar-sweetened beverages.

Mathias KC, Slining MM, Popkin BM.

Am J Prev Med. 2013 Apr;44(4):351-7. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2012.11.036.

15.

Beverage patterns among Canadian children and relationship to overweight and obesity.

Danyliw AD, Vatanparast H, Nikpartow N, Whiting SJ.

Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Oct;37(5):900-6. doi: 10.1139/h2012-074. Epub 2012 Jun 14.

16.

Salt intake is related to soft drink consumption in children and adolescents: a link to obesity?

He FJ, Marrero NM, MacGregor GA.

Hypertension. 2008 Mar;51(3):629-34. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.107.100990.

17.
18.

Sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain in 2- to 5-year-old children.

DeBoer MD, Scharf RJ, Demmer RT.

Pediatrics. 2013 Sep;132(3):413-20. doi: 10.1542/peds.2013-0570. Epub 2013 Aug 5.

19.

Association of key foods and beverages with obesity in Australian schoolchildren.

Sanigorski AM, Bell AC, Swinburn BA.

Public Health Nutr. 2007 Feb;10(2):152-7.

PMID:
17261224
20.

What proportion of preschool-aged children consume sweetened beverages?

Nickelson J, Lawrence JC, Parton JM, Knowlden AP, McDermott RJ.

J Sch Health. 2014 Mar;84(3):185-94. doi: 10.1111/josh.12136.

PMID:
24443780
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