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Results: 1 to 20 of 487

1.

Misperceptions of peer norms as a risk factor for sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among secondary school students.

Perkins JM, Perkins HW, Craig DW.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Dec;110(12):1916-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2010.09.008.

PMID:
21111101
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
2.

School vending machine use and fast-food restaurant use are associated with sugar-sweetened beverage intake in youth.

Wiecha JL, Finkelstein D, Troped PJ, Fragala M, Peterson KE.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Oct;106(10):1624-30.

PMID:
17000195
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
3.

Effect of school district policy change on consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among high school students, Boston, Massachusetts, 2004-2006.

Cradock AL, McHugh A, Mont-Ferguson H, Grant L, Barrett JL, Wang YC, Gortmaker SL.

Prev Chronic Dis. 2011 Jul;8(4):A74. Epub 2011 Jun 15.

PMID:
21672398
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
4.

Beverage intake improvement by high school students in Saskatchewan, Canada.

Lo E, Coles R, Humbert ML, Polowski J, Henry CJ, Whiting SJ.

Nutr Res. 2008 Mar;28(3):144-50. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2008.01.005.

PMID:
19083401
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
5.

Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage intake among college students.

West DS, Bursac Z, Quimby D, Prewitt TE, Spatz T, Nash C, Mays G, Eddings K.

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Oct;14(10):1825-31.

PMID:
17062813
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
6.

Readiness to change sugar sweetened beverage intake among college students.

Huffman L, West DS.

Eat Behav. 2007 Jan;8(1):10-4. Epub 2006 May 30.

PMID:
17174846
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
7.

Adolescent screen-viewing behaviour is associated with consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages: the role of habit strength and perceived parental norms.

Kremers SP, van der Horst K, Brug J.

Appetite. 2007 May;48(3):345-50. Epub 2006 Nov 28.

PMID:
17126451
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
8.

Increasing caloric contribution from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juices among US children and adolescents, 1988-2004.

Wang YC, Bleich SN, Gortmaker SL.

Pediatrics. 2008 Jun;121(6):e1604-14. doi: 10.1542/peds.2007-2834.

PMID:
18519465
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
9.

Self-reported academic grades and other correlates of sugar-sweetened soda intake among US adolescents.

Park S, Sherry B, Foti K, Blanck HM.

J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012 Jan;112(1):125-31. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2011.08.045. Epub 2011 Dec 22.

PMID:
22709642
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
10.

Regular sugar-sweetened beverage consumption between meals increases risk of overweight among preschool-aged children.

Dubois L, Farmer A, Girard M, Peterson K.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jun;107(6):924-34; discussion 934-5.

PMID:
17524711
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
11.

School food environments and practices affect dietary behaviors of US public school children.

Briefel RR, Crepinsek MK, Cabili C, Wilson A, Gleason PM.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Feb;109(2 Suppl):S91-107. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2008.10.059.

PMID:
19166677
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
12.

Perceived parenting style and practices and the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages by adolescents.

van der Horst K, Kremers S, Ferreira I, Singh A, Oenema A, Brug J.

Health Educ Res. 2007 Apr;22(2):295-304. Epub 2006 Aug 14.

PMID:
16908496
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
13.

Reduced availability of sugar-sweetened beverages and diet soda has a limited impact on beverage consumption patterns in Maine high school youth.

Blum JE, Davee AM, Beaudoin CM, Jenkins PL, Kaley LA, Wigand DA.

J Nutr Educ Behav. 2008 Nov-Dec;40(6):341-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2007.12.004.

PMID:
18984489
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
14.

The impact of the availability of school vending machines on eating behavior during lunch: the Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey.

Park S, Sappenfield WM, Huang Y, Sherry B, Bensyl DM.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Oct;110(10):1532-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2010.07.003.

PMID:
20869493
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
15.

Reduction in sugar-sweetened beverages is not associated with more water or diet drinks.

Veitch J, Singh A, van Stralen MM, van Mechelen W, Brug J, Chinapaw MJ.

Public Health Nutr. 2011 Aug;14(8):1388-93. doi: 10.1017/S1368980010002727. Epub 2010 Oct 29.

PMID:
21029506
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
16.

Secular trends in children's sweetened-beverage consumption (1973 to 1994): the Bogalusa Heart Study.

Rajeshwari R, Yang SJ, Nicklas TA, Berenson GS.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Feb;105(2):208-14.

PMID:
15668676
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
17.

Consumption of low-nutrient, energy-dense foods and beverages at school, home, and other locations among school lunch participants and nonparticipants.

Briefel RR, Wilson A, Gleason PM.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Feb;109(2 Suppl):S79-90. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2008.10.064.

PMID:
19166676
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
18.

Taxing sugar-sweetened beverages: a survey of knowledge, attitudes and behaviours.

Rivard C, Smith D, McCann SE, Hyland A.

Public Health Nutr. 2012 Aug;15(8):1355-61. doi: 10.1017/S1368980011002898. Epub 2012 Jan 24.

PMID:
22269063
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
19.

Reducing calories and added sugars by improving children's beverage choices.

Briefel RR, Wilson A, Cabili C, Hedley Dodd A.

J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Feb;113(2):269-75. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2012.10.016.

PMID:
23351631
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
20.

Policies that restrict sweetened beverage availability may reduce consumption in elementary-school children.

Jones SJ, Gonzalez W, Frongillo EA.

Public Health Nutr. 2010 Apr;13(4):589-95. doi: 10.1017/S1368980009991819. Epub 2009 Oct 28.

PMID:
19860991
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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