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Items: 1 to 20 of 106

1.

Sex differences in cognitive control are associated with midcingulate and callosal morphology.

Huster RJ, Westerhausen R, Herrmann CS.

Brain Struct Funct. 2011 Jan;215(3-4):225-35. doi: 10.1007/s00429-010-0289-2. Epub 2010 Nov 5.

PMID:
21052715
2.

Anatomical-behavioral relationships: corpus callosum morphometry and hemispheric specialization.

Clarke JM, Zaidel E.

Behav Brain Res. 1994 Oct 20;64(1-2):185-202.

PMID:
7840886
3.

The role of the cingulate cortex as neural generator of the N200 and P300 in a tactile response inhibition task.

Huster RJ, Westerhausen R, Pantev C, Konrad C.

Hum Brain Mapp. 2010 Aug;31(8):1260-71. doi: 10.1002/hbm.20933.

PMID:
20063362
4.

Variations in midcingulate morphology are related to ERP indices of cognitive control.

Huster RJ, Enriquez-Geppert S, Pantev C, Bruchmann M.

Brain Struct Funct. 2014 Jan;219(1):49-60. doi: 10.1007/s00429-012-0483-5. Epub 2012 Nov 22.

PMID:
23179865
5.
6.

Individual differences in anterior cingulate/paracingulate morphology are related to executive functions in healthy males.

Fornito A, Yücel M, Wood S, Stuart GW, Buchanan JA, Proffitt T, Anderson V, Velakoulis D, Pantelis C.

Cereb Cortex. 2004 Apr;14(4):424-31.

7.

P300 and handedness: on the possible contribution of corpus callosal size to ERPs.

Polich J, Hoffman LD.

Psychophysiology. 1998 Sep;35(5):497-507.

PMID:
9715094
9.

Corpus callosum size correlates with asymmetric performance on a dichotic listening task in healthy aging but not in Alzheimer's disease.

Gootjes L, Bouma A, Van Strien JW, Van Schijndel R, Barkhof F, Scheltens P.

Neuropsychologia. 2006;44(2):208-17. Epub 2005 Jun 13.

PMID:
15955540
10.

Variations in human corpus callosum do not predict gender: a study using magnetic resonance imaging.

Byne W, Bleier R, Houston L.

Behav Neurosci. 1988 Apr;102(2):222-7.

PMID:
3365317
11.

Cerebral dominance, sex, and callosal size in MRI.

Kertesz A, Polk M, Howell J, Black SE.

Neurology. 1987 Aug;37(8):1385-8.

PMID:
3614665
12.

P300, handedness, and corpus callosal size: gender, modality, and task.

Hoffman LD, Polich J.

Int J Psychophysiol. 1999 Jan;31(2):163-74.

PMID:
9987062
13.

Individual differences in lateralization: effects of gender and handedness.

Eviatar Z, Hellige JB, Zaidel E.

Neuropsychology. 1997 Oct;11(4):562-76.

PMID:
9345700
14.

Contribution of posterior corpus callosum to the interhemispheric transfer of tactile information.

Fabri M, Del Pesce M, Paggi A, Polonara G, Bartolini M, Salvolini U, Manzoni T.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res. 2005 Jun;24(1):73-80. Epub 2005 Jan 22.

PMID:
15922160
15.

Callosal tracts and patterns of hemispheric dominance: a combined fMRI and DTI study.

Häberling IS, Badzakova-Trajkov G, Corballis MC.

Neuroimage. 2011 Jan 15;54(2):779-86. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.09.072. Epub 2010 Oct 18.

PMID:
20920586
16.

Behavioral correlates of corpus callosum size: anatomical/behavioral relationships vary across sex/handedness groups.

Welcome SE, Chiarello C, Towler S, Halderman LK, Otto R, Leonard CM.

Neuropsychologia. 2009 Oct;47(12):2427-35. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2009.04.008. Epub 2009 Apr 19.

17.

Sexual dimorphism in interhemispheric relations: anatomical-behavioral convergence.

Zaidel E, Aboitiz F, Clarke J.

Biol Res. 1995;28(1):27-43. Review.

PMID:
8728818
18.

Gender differences in lateralization of mismatch negativity in dichotic listening tasks.

Ikezawa S, Nakagome K, Mimura M, Shinoda J, Itoh K, Homma I, Kamijima K.

Int J Psychophysiol. 2008 Apr;68(1):41-50. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2008.01.006. Epub 2008 Jan 26.

PMID:
18295364
19.

Effects of handedness and gender on macro- and microstructure of the corpus callosum and its subregions: a combined high-resolution and diffusion-tensor MRI study.

Westerhausen R, Kreuder F, Dos Santos Sequeira S, Walter C, Woerner W, Wittling RA, Schweiger E, Wittling W.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res. 2004 Nov;21(3):418-26.

PMID:
15511657
20.
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