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Items: 1 to 20 of 170

1.

A quadruple-enterotoxin-deficient mutant of Bacillus thuringiensis remains insecticidal.

Klimowicz AK, Benson TA, Handelsman J.

Microbiology. 2010 Dec;156(Pt 12):3575-83. doi: 10.1099/mic.0.039925-0. Epub 2010 Sep 9.

PMID:
20829288
2.

Detection of enterotoxic Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis strains by PCR analysis.

Hansen BM, Hendriksen NB.

Appl Environ Microbiol. 2001 Jan;67(1):185-9.

3.
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Enterotoxigenicity and cytotoxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis strains and development of a process for Cry1Ac production.

Yang CY, Pang JC, Kao SS, Tsen HY.

J Agric Food Chem. 2003 Jan 1;51(1):100-5.

PMID:
12502392
5.

[Detection of some toxin genes related to pathogenicity in Bacillus cereus group strains].

Hu XM, Cai YJ, Zhou GP, Yuan ZM.

Wei Sheng Wu Xue Bao. 2007 Jun;47(3):392-5. Chinese.

PMID:
17672293
6.

Common occurrence of enterotoxin genes and enterotoxicity in Bacillus thuringiensis.

Gaviria Rivera AM, Granum PE, Priest FG.

FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2000 Sep 1;190(1):151-5.

7.

Hemolytic and nonhemolytic enterotoxin genes are broadly distributed among Bacillus thuringiensis isolated from wild mammals.

Swiecicka I, Van der Auwera GA, Mahillon J.

Microb Ecol. 2006 Oct;52(3):544-51. Epub 2006 Aug 31.

PMID:
16944343
8.

Toxin production in a rare and genetically remote cluster of strains of the Bacillus cereus group.

Fagerlund A, Brillard J, Fürst R, Guinebretière MH, Granum PE.

BMC Microbiol. 2007 May 21;7:43.

10.

Detection of enterotoxin genes in mosquito-larvicidal Bacillus species.

Yuan Z, Hansen BM, Andrup L, Eilenberg J.

Curr Microbiol. 2002 Sep;45(3):221-5.

PMID:
12177746
11.
12.

[Screening of Bacillus thuringiensis strains containing vip3A genes and analysis of gene conservation].

Chen JW, Tang LX, Song SY, Yuan MJ, Pang Y.

Sheng Wu Gong Cheng Xue Bao. 2003 Sep;19(5):538-44. Chinese.

PMID:
15969080
13.

Isolation and characterization of Bacillus cereus-like bacteria from faecal samples from greenhouse workers who are using Bacillus thuringiensis-based insecticides.

Jensen GB, Larsen P, Jacobsen BL, Madsen B, Wilcks A, Smidt L, Andrup L.

Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2002 Mar;75(3):191-6.

PMID:
11954987
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15.

Bacillus cereus cytotoxins Hbl, Nhe and CytK are secreted via the Sec translocation pathway.

Fagerlund A, Lindbäck T, Granum PE.

BMC Microbiol. 2010 Nov 30;10:304. doi: 10.1186/1471-2180-10-304.

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17.

[Detection of enterotoxin genes in Bacillus thuringiensis by PCR].

Yuan Z, Cai Q, Andrup L, Eilenberg J, Pang Y.

Wei Sheng Wu Xue Bao. 2001 Apr;41(2):148-54. Chinese.

PMID:
12549018
18.

Broad distribution of enterotoxin genes (hblCDA, nheABC, cytK, and entFM) among Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus as shown by novel primers.

Ngamwongsatit P, Buasri W, Pianariyanon P, Pulsrikarn C, Ohba M, Assavanig A, Panbangred W.

Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Feb 10;121(3):352-6. Epub 2007 Nov 17.

PMID:
18068844
19.

The Bacillus cereus Hbl and Nhe tripartite enterotoxin components assemble sequentially on the surface of target cells and are not interchangeable.

Sastalla I, Fattah R, Coppage N, Nandy P, Crown D, Pomerantsev AP, Leppla SH.

PLoS One. 2013 Oct 18;8(10):e76955. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0076955. eCollection 2013.

20.

Detection of toxigenic Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis spores in U.S. rice.

Ankolekar C, Rahmati T, Labbé RG.

Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Jan 15;128(3):460-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2008.10.006. Epub 2008 Oct 17.

PMID:
19027973
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