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Items: 1 to 20 of 220

1.

Pulmonary toxicity and extrapulmonary tissue distribution of metals after repeated exposure to different welding fumes.

Antonini JM, Roberts JR, Chapman RS, Soukup JM, Ghio AJ, Sriram K.

Inhal Toxicol. 2010 Aug;22(10):805-16. doi: 10.3109/08958371003621641.

PMID:
20560776
2.

Persistence of deposited metals in the lungs after stainless steel and mild steel welding fume inhalation in rats.

Antonini JM, Roberts JR, Stone S, Chen BT, Schwegler-Berry D, Chapman R, Zeidler-Erdely PC, Andrews RN, Frazer DG.

Arch Toxicol. 2011 May;85(5):487-98. doi: 10.1007/s00204-010-0601-1. Epub 2010 Oct 6.

PMID:
20924559
3.

Pneumotoxicity and pulmonary clearance of different welding fumes after intratracheal instillation in the rat.

Antonini JM, Krishna Murthy GG, Rogers RA, Albert R, Ulrich GD, Brain JD.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1996 Sep;140(1):188-99.

PMID:
8806885
4.

Suppression in lung defense responses after bacterial infection in rats pretreated with different welding fumes.

Antonini JM, Taylor MD, Millecchia L, Bebout AR, Roberts JR.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2004 Nov 1;200(3):206-18.

PMID:
15504457
5.

Effect of welding fume solubility on lung macrophage viability and function in vitro.

Antonini JM, Lawryk NJ, Murthy GG, Brain JD.

J Toxicol Environ Health A. 1999 Nov 26;58(6):343-63.

PMID:
10580758
6.

Mild steel welding fume causes manganese accumulation and subtle neuroinflammatory changes but not overt neuronal damage in discrete brain regions of rats after short-term inhalation exposure.

Antonini JM, Sriram K, Benkovic SA, Roberts JR, Stone S, Chen BT, Schwegler-Berry D, Jefferson AM, Billig BK, Felton CM, Hammer MA, Ma F, Frazer DG, O'Callaghan JP, Miller DB.

Neurotoxicology. 2009 Nov;30(6):915-25. doi: 10.1016/j.neuro.2009.09.006. Epub 2009 Sep 25.

PMID:
19782702
7.

Effect of short-term stainless steel welding fume inhalation exposure on lung inflammation, injury, and defense responses in rats.

Antonini JM, Stone S, Roberts JR, Chen B, Schwegler-Berry D, Afshari AA, Frazer DG.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2007 Sep 15;223(3):234-45. Epub 2007 Jul 6.

PMID:
17706736
8.

Responses to welding fumes: lung injury, inflammation, and the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta.

Antonini JM, Krishna Murthy GG, Brain JD.

Exp Lung Res. 1997 May-Jun;23(3):205-27.

PMID:
9184789
9.

Inflammatory and genotoxic responses during 30-day welding-fume exposure period.

Yu IJ, Song KS, Maeng SH, Kim SJ, Sung JH, Han JH, Chung YH, Cho MH, Chung KH, Han KT, Hyun JS, Kim KJ.

Toxicol Lett. 2004 Dec 1;154(1-2):105-15.

PMID:
15475184
10.

Effects of welding fumes of differing composition and solubility on free radical production and acute lung injury and inflammation in rats.

Taylor MD, Roberts JR, Leonard SS, Shi X, Antonini JM.

Toxicol Sci. 2003 Sep;75(1):181-91. Epub 2003 Jun 27.

11.

Lung fibrosis in Sprague-Dawley rats, induced by exposure to manual metal arc-stainless steel welding fumes.

Yu IJ, Song KS, Chang HK, Han JH, Kim KJ, Chung YH, Maeng SH, Park SH, Han KT, Chung KH, Chung HK.

Toxicol Sci. 2001 Sep;63(1):99-106.

12.

Dopaminergic neurotoxicity following pulmonary exposure to manganese-containing welding fumes.

Sriram K, Lin GX, Jefferson AM, Roberts JR, Chapman RS, Chen BT, Soukup JM, Ghio AJ, Antonini JM.

Arch Toxicol. 2010 Jul;84(7):521-40. doi: 10.1007/s00204-010-0525-9. Epub 2010 Mar 12.

PMID:
20224926
13.

Short-term inhalation exposure to mild steel welding fume had no effect on lung inflammation and injury but did alter defense responses to bacteria in rats.

Antonini JM, Roberts JR, Stone S, Chen BT, Schwegler-Berry D, Frazer DG.

Inhal Toxicol. 2009 Feb;21(3):182-92. doi: 10.1080/08958370802360661 .

PMID:
18925477
14.

Recurrent exposure to welding fumes induces insufficient recovery from inflammation.

Yang MJ, Yang YS, Sung JH, Kim JS, Cho KH, Lim CW, Chung YH, Kim HY, Yang JS, Yu IJ, Song CW.

Inhal Toxicol. 2009 Feb;21(4):337-46. doi: 10.1080/08958370802448979 .

PMID:
19235612
15.

Critical evaluation of sequential leaching procedures for the determination of Ni and Mn species in welding fumes.

Berlinger B, Náray M, Sajó I, Záray G.

Ann Occup Hyg. 2009 Jun;53(4):333-40. doi: 10.1093/annhyg/mep013. Epub 2009 Mar 24.

16.

Pulmonary responses to welding fumes: role of metal constituents.

Antonini JM, Taylor MD, Zimmer AT, Roberts JR.

J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2004 Feb 13;67(3):233-49. Review.

PMID:
14681078
17.

Effect of stainless steel manual metal arc welding fume on free radical production, DNA damage, and apoptosis induction.

Antonini JM, Leonard SS, Roberts JR, Solano-Lopez C, Young SH, Shi X, Taylor MD.

Mol Cell Biochem. 2005 Nov;279(1-2):17-23.

PMID:
16283511
18.

Manganese accumulation in nail clippings as a biomarker of welding fume exposure and neurotoxicity.

Sriram K, Lin GX, Jefferson AM, Roberts JR, Andrews RN, Kashon ML, Antonini JM.

Toxicology. 2012 Jan 27;291(1-3):73-82. doi: 10.1016/j.tox.2011.10.021. Epub 2011 Nov 9.

PMID:
22085607
19.

Freshly generated stainless steel welding fume induces greater lung inflammation in rats as compared to aged fume.

Antonini JM, Clarke RW, Krishna Murthy GG, Sreekanthan P, Jenkins N, Eagar TW, Brain JD.

Toxicol Lett. 1998 Sep 1;98(1-2):77-86.

PMID:
9776564
20.

Changes in blood manganese concentration and MRI t1 relaxation time during 180 days of stainless steel welding-fume exposure in cynomolgus monkeys.

Sung JH, Kim CY, Yang SO, Khang HS, Cheong HK, Lee JS, Song CW, Park JD, Han JH, Chung YH, Choi BS, Kwon IH, Cho MH, Yu IJ.

Inhal Toxicol. 2007 Jan;19(1):47-55.

PMID:
17127642
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