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Items: 1 to 20 of 123

1.

Fraud and misconduct in science: the stem cell seduction: Implications for the peer-review process.

van der Heyden MA, van de Ven T, Opthof T.

Neth Heart J. 2009 Jan;17(1):25-9.

2.

Eyes wide open: reader and author responsibility in understanding the limits of peer review.

Benson PJ.

Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2015 Oct;97(7):487-9. doi: 10.1308/rcsann.2015.0032.

PMID:
26414359
4.

[The management of errors and scientific fraud by biomedical journals: They cannot replace Institutions].

Maisonneuve H.

Presse Med. 2012 Sep;41(9 Pt 1):853-60. doi: 10.1016/j.lpm.2012.05.009. Epub 2012 Jul 24. French.

PMID:
22836196
5.

Scientific misconduct. How prevalent is fraud? That's a million-dollar question.

Marshall E.

Science. 2000 Dec 1;290(5497):1662-3.

PMID:
11186377
6.

Woo Suk Hwang convicted, but not of fraud.

Cyranoski D.

Nature. 2009 Oct 29;461(7268):1181. doi: 10.1038/4611181a. No abstract available.

PMID:
19865133
7.

The legacy of the Hwang case: research misconduct in biosciences.

Kakuk P.

Sci Eng Ethics. 2009 Dec;15(4):545-62. doi: 10.1007/s11948-009-9121-x. Epub 2009 Feb 27.

PMID:
19247809
8.

Misconduct and fraud in research: social and legislative issues symposium of the Society of University Surgeons.

Simmons RL, Polk HC Jr, Williams B, Mavroudis C.

Surgery. 1991 Jul;110(1):1-7.

PMID:
1866681
9.

[Fraud and misconduct in scientific publications].

Matías-Guiu J, García-Ramos R.

Neurologia. 2010 Jan-Feb;25(1):1-4. Review. Spanish.

10.

[Fraudulent publication in medical journals].

Becerril-Ángeles M, García-Gómez F.

Rev Med Inst Mex Seguro Soc. 2014 Mar-Apr;52(2):182-7. Spanish.

PMID:
24758857
11.

Research ethics and lessons from Hwanggate: what can we learn from the Korean cloning fraud?

Saunders R, Savulescu J.

J Med Ethics. 2008 Mar;34(3):214-21. doi: 10.1136/jme.2007.023721. Review.

PMID:
18316467
12.

The implications of fraud in medical and scientific research.

Slesser AA, Qureshi YA.

World J Surg. 2009 Nov;33(11):2355-9. doi: 10.1007/s00268-009-0201-5.

PMID:
19701662
13.

Using criminalization and due process to reduce scientific misconduct.

Sovacool BK.

Am J Bioeth. 2005 Sep-Oct;5(5):W1-7.

PMID:
16179287
14.

Stem cell research: cloning, therapy and scientific fraud.

Rusnak AJ, Chudley AE.

Clin Genet. 2006 Oct;70(4):302-5. Review.

PMID:
16965321
15.

Scientific fraud: definitions, policies, and implications for nursing research.

Chop RM, Silva MC.

J Prof Nurs. 1991 May-Jun;7(3):166-71.

PMID:
2061524
16.

Advice to individuals involved in misconduct accusations.

Friedman PJ.

Acad Med. 1996 Jul;71(7):716-23.

PMID:
9158338
17.

Publication fraud: implications to the individual and to the specialty.

Miller DR.

Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2011 Apr;24(2):154-9. doi: 10.1097/ACO.0b013e328344529d. Review.

PMID:
21252647
18.

Scientific Misconduct and the Myth of Self-Correction in Science.

Stroebe W, Postmes T, Spears R.

Perspect Psychol Sci. 2012 Nov;7(6):670-88. doi: 10.1177/1745691612460687.

PMID:
26168129
19.

Denotation and connotation in public representation: Semantic network analysis of Hwang supporters' internet dialogues.

Kim L.

Public Underst Sci. 2013 Apr;22(3):335-50. doi: 10.1177/0963662511401784. Epub 2011 May 10.

PMID:
23833058
20.

Disreputable science: definition and detection.

Morrison RS.

J Adv Nurs. 1990 Aug;15(8):911-3.

PMID:
2229687
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