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Items: 1 to 20 of 307

1.

The effect of change in clinical state on eye movement dysfunction in schizophrenia.

Kallimani D, Theleritis C, Evdokimidis I, Stefanis NC, Chatzimanolis I, Smyrnis N.

Eur Psychiatry. 2009 Jan;24(1):17-26. doi: 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2008.08.003. Epub 2008 Oct 14.

PMID:
18922684
2.
3.

Smooth pursuit and saccadic abnormalities in first-episode schizophrenia.

Hutton SB, Crawford TJ, Puri BK, Duncan LJ, Chapman M, Kennard C, Barnes TR, Joyce EM.

Psychol Med. 1998 May;28(3):685-92.

PMID:
9626724
4.

Eye movement dysfunction as a biological marker of risk for schizophrenia.

Lee KH, Williams LM.

Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2000 Nov;34 Suppl:S91-100. Review.

PMID:
11129321
5.

Schizophrenia-related neuregulin-1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms lead to deficient smooth eye pursuit in a large sample of young men.

Smyrnis N, Kattoulas E, Stefanis NC, Avramopoulos D, Stefanis CN, Evdokimidis I.

Schizophr Bull. 2011 Jul;37(4):822-31. doi: 10.1093/schbul/sbp150. Epub 2009 Dec 4.

6.

Eye movements and psychopathology in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Tien AY, Ross DE, Pearlson G, Strauss ME.

J Nerv Ment Dis. 1996 Jun;184(6):331-8.

PMID:
8642381
7.

Further analysis of the control of voluntary saccadic eye movements in schizophrenic patients.

Fukushima J, Fukushima K, Morita N, Yamashita I.

Biol Psychiatry. 1990 Dec 1;28(11):943-58.

PMID:
2275952
8.

Smooth pursuit eye movements in schizophrenia and affective disorder.

Flechtner KM, Steinacher B, Sauer R, Mackert A.

Psychol Med. 1997 Nov;27(6):1411-9.

PMID:
9403912
9.

Smooth pursuit eye movements of patients with schizophrenia and affective disorder during clinical treatment.

Flechtner KM, Steinacher B, Sauer R, Mackert A.

Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2002 Apr;252(2):49-53.

PMID:
12111336
10.

Smooth pursuit and antisaccade performance evidence trait stability in schizophrenia patients and their relatives.

Calkins ME, Iacono WG, Curtis CE.

Int J Psychophysiol. 2003 Aug;49(2):139-46.

PMID:
12919716
11.

Short and long term effects of antipsychotic medication on smooth pursuit eye tracking in schizophrenia.

Hutton SB, Crawford TJ, Gibbins H, Cuthbert I, Barnes TR, Kennard C, Joyce EM.

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2001 Sep;157(3):284-91.

PMID:
11605084
12.
13.

Eye tracking in schizophrenia: does the antisaccade task measure anything that the smooth pursuit task does not?

Zanelli J, Simon H, Rabe-Hesketh S, Walshe M, McDonald C, Murray RM, Maccabe JH.

Psychiatry Res. 2005 Sep 15;136(2-3):181-8.

PMID:
16111769
14.

Are eye movement abnormalities indicators of genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia?

Boudet C, Bocca ML, Chabot B, Delamillieure P, Brazo P, Denise P, Dollfus S.

Eur Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;20(4):339-45.

PMID:
16018927
15.

Smooth pursuit and antisaccade eye movements in siblings discordant for schizophrenia.

Ettinger U, Kumari V, Crawford TJ, Corr PJ, Das M, Zachariah E, Hughes C, Sumich AL, Rabe-Hesketh S, Sharma T.

J Psychiatr Res. 2004 Mar-Apr;38(2):177-84.

PMID:
14757332
16.

Smooth-pursuit eye movement dysfunction and liability for schizophrenia: implications for genetic modeling.

Clementz BA, Grove WM, Iacono WG, Sweeney JA.

J Abnorm Psychol. 1992 Feb;101(1):117-29.

PMID:
1537958
18.

Human oculomotor function: reliability and diurnal variation.

Roy-Byrne P, Radant A, Wingerson D, Cowley DS.

Biol Psychiatry. 1995 Jul 15;38(2):92-7.

PMID:
7578655
19.

Changes in eye tracking during clinical stabilization in schizophrenia.

Rea MM, Sweeney JA, Solomon CM, Walsh V, Frances A.

Psychiatry Res. 1989 Apr;28(1):31-9.

PMID:
2568005
20.

Smooth pursuit eye movements and voluntary control of saccades in the antisaccade task in schizophrenic patients.

Matsue Y, Saito H, Osakabe K, Awata S, Ueno T, Matsuoka H, Chiba H, Fuse Y, Sato M.

Jpn J Psychiatry Neurol. 1994 Mar;48(1):13-22.

PMID:
7933710
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