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Items: 1 to 20 of 202

1.
2.

Fetal cells in cervical mucus in the first trimester of pregnancy.

Cioni R, Bussani C, Scarselli B, Bucciantini S, Barciulli F, Scarselli G.

Prenat Diagn. 2003 Feb;23(2):168-71.

PMID:
12575028
3.
4.

Transcervical sampling as a means of detection of fetal cells during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Daryani YP, Barker GH, Penna LK, Patton MA.

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Sep;183(3):752-4.

PMID:
10992204
5.

HLA-G positive trophoblastic cells in transcervical samples and their isolation and analysis by laser microdissection and QF-PCR.

Bulmer JN, Cioni R, Bussani C, Cirigliano V, Sole F, Costa C, Garcia P, Adinolfi M.

Prenat Diagn. 2003 Jan;23(1):34-9.

PMID:
12533810
6.

Transcervical recovery of fetal cells from the lower uterine pole: reliability of recovery and histological/immunocytochemical analysis of recovered cell populations.

Miller D, Briggs J, Rahman MS, Griffith-Jones M, Rane V, Everett M, Lilford RJ, Bulmer JN.

Hum Reprod. 1999 Feb;14(2):521-31.

7.

Methods for the transcervical collection of fetal cells during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Rodeck C, Tutschek B, Sherlock J, Kingdom J.

Prenat Diagn. 1995 Oct;15(10):933-42.

PMID:
8587861
8.

Fetal cells in transcervical samples at an early stage of gestation.

Adinolfi M, Sherlock J.

J Hum Genet. 2001;46(3):99-104. Review.

PMID:
11310588
9.

[Early prenatal diagnosis using fetal cells acquired from different sites of uterine cervix: a preliminary study].

Zhang L, Duan T.

Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi. 2006 Sep 5;86(33):2343-7. Chinese.

PMID:
17156633
10.

Immunohistochemical characterization of cells retrieved by transcervical sampling in early pregnancy.

Bulmer JN, Rodeck C, Adinolfi M.

Prenat Diagn. 1995 Dec;15(12):1143-53.

PMID:
8750295
11.
12.

[Acquisition of fetal cells from transcervcial cells in early pregnancy and immunocytochemical study].

Huang YY, Yu YH.

Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao. 2006 Nov;26(11):1571-3. Chinese.

13.

Strategies for the isolation and detection of fetal cells in transcervical samples.

Bussani C, Cioni R, Scarselli B, Barciulli F, Bucciantini S, Simi P, Fogli A, Scarselli G.

Prenat Diagn. 2002 Dec;22(12):1098-101.

PMID:
12454965
14.

Comparison of two techniques for transcervical cell sampling performed in the same study population.

Cioni R, Bussani C, Scarselli B, Bucciantini S, Marchionni M, Scarselli G.

Prenat Diagn. 2005 Mar;25(3):198-202.

PMID:
15791667
15.

Prenatal diagnosis by minimally invasive first-trimester transcervical sampling is unreliable.

Overton TG, Lighten AD, Fisk NM, Bennett PR.

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1996 Aug;175(2):382-7.

PMID:
8765257
16.

Use of the quantitative fluorescent-PCR assay in the study of fetal DNA from micromanipulated transcervical samples.

Bussani C, Scarselli B, Cioni R, Bucciantini S, Scarselli G.

Mol Diagn. 2004;8(4):259-63.

PMID:
15887982
17.

Potential of syncytiotrophoblasts isolated from the cervical mucus for early non-invasive prenatal diagnosis: evidence of a vanishing twin.

Mantzaris D, Cram DS.

Clin Chim Acta. 2015 Jan 1;438:309-15. doi: 10.1016/j.cca.2014.09.002. Epub 2014 Sep 8.

PMID:
25218787
18.

Cytokeratin immunohistochemistry: a procedure for exclusion of pregnancy in chorionic villi-negative specimen.

Konoplev SN, Dimashkieh HH, Stanek J.

Placenta. 2004 Feb-Mar;25(2-3):146-52.

PMID:
14972447
19.

Detection of cells of fetal origin from transcervical irrigations.

Daryani YP, Penna LK, Patton MA.

Prenat Diagn. 1997 Mar;17(3):243-8.

PMID:
9110368
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