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Items: 1 to 20 of 283

1.

Crop-to-wild gene flow, introgression and possible fitness effects of transgenes.

Jenczewski E, Ronfort J, Chèvre AM.

Environ Biosafety Res. 2003 Jan-Mar;2(1):9-24. Review.

PMID:
15615064
2.
4.

Environmental implications of gene flow from sugar beet to wild beet--current status and future research needs.

Bartsch D, Cuguen J, Biancardi E, Sweet J.

Environ Biosafety Res. 2003 Apr-Jun;2(2):105-15. Review.

PMID:
15612276
5.
6.

Evaluating genetic containment strategies for transgenic plants.

Lee D, Natesan E.

Trends Biotechnol. 2006 Mar;24(3):109-14. Epub 2006 Feb 7. Review.

PMID:
16460821
7.

Letting the gene out of the bottle: the population genetics of genetically modified crops.

Chapman MA, Burke JM.

New Phytol. 2006;170(3):429-43. Review.

PMID:
16626466
8.

Transgene introgression from genetically modified crops to their wild relatives.

Stewart CN Jr, Halfhill MD, Warwick SI.

Nat Rev Genet. 2003 Oct;4(10):806-17. Review. Erratum in: Nat Rev Genet. 2004 Apr;5(4):310.

PMID:
14526376
9.

The use of cytogenetic tools for studies in the crop-to-wild gene transfer scenario.

Benavente E, Cifuentes M, Dusautoir JC, David J.

Cytogenet Genome Res. 2008;120(3-4):384-95. doi: 10.1159/000121087. Epub 2008 May 23. Review.

PMID:
18504367
10.

Risk assessment of genetically engineered crops: fitness effects of virus-resistance transgenes in wild Cucurbita pepo.

Laughlin KD, Power AG, Snow AA, Spencer LJ.

Ecol Appl. 2009 Jul;19(5):1091-101.

PMID:
19688918
12.

Persistence of sunflower crop traits and fitness in Helianthus petiolaris populations.

Gutierrez A, Cantamutto M, Poverene M.

Plant Biol (Stuttg). 2011 Sep;13(5):821-30. doi: 10.1111/j.1438-8677.2010.00433.x. Epub 2011 Feb 8.

PMID:
21815987
13.

Plant fitness assessment for wild relatives of insect resistant crops.

Letourneau DK, Hagen JA.

Environ Biosafety Res. 2009 Jan-Mar;8(1):45-55. doi: 10.1051/ebr/2008024. Epub 2009 Jan 22.

14.

Adaptive nature of crop cytoplasm.

Mercer KL.

New Phytol. 2009;183(4):925-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2009.02991.x. No abstract available.

PMID:
19702776
15.
16.

Genetic load and transgenic mitigating genes in transgenic Brassica rapa (field mustard) x Brassica napus (oilseed rape) hybrid populations.

Rose CW, Millwood RJ, Moon HS, Rao MR, Halfhill MD, Raymer PL, Warwick SI, Al-Ahmad H, Gressel J, Stewart CN Jr.

BMC Biotechnol. 2009 Oct 31;9:93. doi: 10.1186/1472-6750-9-93.

17.

Long distance pollen-mediated gene flow at a landscape level: the weed beet as a case study.

Fénart S, Austerlitz F, Cuguen J, Arnaud JF.

Mol Ecol. 2007 Sep;16(18):3801-13.

PMID:
17850547
18.

Impact of interspecific hybridization between crops and weedy relatives on the evolution of flowering time in weedy phenotypes.

Vacher C, Kossler TM, Hochberg ME, Weis AE.

PLoS One. 2011 Feb 3;6(2):e14649. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0014649.

19.

Employing a composite gene-flow index to numerically quantify a crop's potential for gene flow: an Irish perspective.

Flannery ML, Meade C, Mullins E.

Environ Biosafety Res. 2005 Jan-Mar;4(1):29-43.

PMID:
16209134
20.

Genetic and ecological consequences of transgene flow to the wild flora.

Felber F, Kozlowski G, Arrigo N, Guadagnuolo R.

Adv Biochem Eng Biotechnol. 2007;107:173-205. Review.

PMID:
17522826
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