Format
Sort by

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 126

1.

A survey of dietary supplement use during pregnancy at an academic medical center.

Tsui B, Dennehy CE, Tsourounis C.

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2001 Aug;185(2):433-7.

PMID:
11518905
2.

Dietary supplement use among menopausal women attending a San Francisco health conference.

Kam IW, Dennehy CE, Tsourounis C.

Menopause. 2002 Jan-Feb;9(1):72-8.

PMID:
11791089
3.

Patterns of vitamin, mineral and herbal supplement use prior to and during pregnancy.

Maats FH, Crowther CA.

Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2002 Nov;42(5):494-6.

PMID:
12495093
4.

Health food stores' recommendations for nausea and migraines during pregnancy.

Buckner KD, Chavez ML, Raney EC, Stoehr JD.

Ann Pharmacother. 2005 Feb;39(2):274-9. Epub 2005 Jan 11.

PMID:
15644475
5.

Complementary and alternative medications for women's health issues.

Lloyd KB, Hornsby LB.

Nutr Clin Pract. 2009 Oct-Nov;24(5):589-608. doi: 10.1177/0884533609343001. Review.

PMID:
19841247
6.

Effect of a ginger extract on pregnancy-induced nausea: a randomised controlled trial.

Willetts KE, Ekangaki A, Eden JA.

Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2003 Apr;43(2):139-44.

PMID:
14712970
7.

Herbal products and dietary supplements: a survey of use, attitudes, and knowledge among older adults.

Marinac JS, Buchinger CL, Godfrey LA, Wooten JM, Sun C, Willsie SK.

J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2007 Jan;107(1):13-20; quiz 21-3.

PMID:
17299031
8.
9.

Use of anti-emetic herbs in pregnancy: women's choices, and the question of safety and efficacy.

Westfall RE.

Complement Ther Nurs Midwifery. 2004 Feb;10(1):30-6.

PMID:
14744504
10.

Omega-3 fatty acids and ginger in maternal health: pharmacology, efficacy, and safety.

Dennehy C.

J Midwifery Womens Health. 2011 Nov-Dec;56(6):584-90. doi: 10.1111/j.1542-2011.2011.00120.x. Epub 2011 Oct 21. Review.

PMID:
22060218
11.

Herbal supplement use among US women, 2000.

Yu SM, Ghandour RM, Huang ZJ.

J Am Med Womens Assoc. 2004 Winter;59(1):17-24.

PMID:
14768981
12.

Prevalence of the use of herbal products in a low-income population.

Planta M, Gundersen B, Petitt JC.

Fam Med. 2000 Apr;32(4):252-7.

PMID:
10782371
13.

Understanding herb and dietary supplement use in patients with epilepsy.

Kaiboriboon K, Guevara M, Alldredge BK.

Epilepsia. 2009 Aug;50(8):1927-32. doi: 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2009.02090.x. Epub 2009 Apr 19.

14.
15.

Dietary supplements in primary care. Botanicals can affect surgical outcomes and follow-up.

Ciocon JO, Ciocon DG, Galindo DJ.

Geriatrics. 2004 Sep;59(9):20-4. Review.

PMID:
15461234
16.

Treating pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting with ginger.

Boone SA, Shields KM.

Ann Pharmacother. 2005 Oct;39(10):1710-3. Epub 2005 Aug 30. Review.

PMID:
16131535
17.

Ginger syrup as an antiemetic in early pregnancy.

Keating A, Chez RA.

Altern Ther Health Med. 2002 Sep-Oct;8(5):89-91.

PMID:
12233808
18.

Dietary supplements in a national survey: Prevalence of use and reports of adverse events.

Timbo BB, Ross MP, McCarthy PV, Lin CT.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Dec;106(12):1966-74.

PMID:
17126626
19.
20.

A randomized comparison of ginger and dimenhydrinate in the treatment of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy.

Pongrojpaw D, Somprasit C, Chanthasenanont A.

J Med Assoc Thai. 2007 Sep;90(9):1703-9.

PMID:
17957907
Items per page

Supplemental Content

Write to the Help Desk