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Items: 1 to 20 of 109

1.

Biochemistry of the non-mevalonate isoprenoid pathway.

Gräwert T, Groll M, Rohdich F, Bacher A, Eisenreich W.

Cell Mol Life Sci. 2011 Dec;68(23):3797-814. doi: 10.1007/s00018-011-0753-z. Epub 2011 Jul 9. Review.

PMID:
21744068
2.

Isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways as anti-infective drug targets.

Rohdich F, Bacher A, Eisenreich W.

Biochem Soc Trans. 2005 Aug;33(Pt 4):785-91. Review.

PMID:
16042599
3.

Biosynthesis of isoprenoids via the non-mevalonate pathway.

Eisenreich W, Bacher A, Arigoni D, Rohdich F.

Cell Mol Life Sci. 2004 Jun;61(12):1401-26. Review.

PMID:
15197467
4.
5.

The non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthesis of plants as a test system for new herbicides and drugs against pathogenic bacteria and the malaria parasite.

Lichtenthaler HK, Zeidler J, Schwender J, Müller C.

Z Naturforsch C. 2000 May-Jun;55(5-6):305-13. Review.

PMID:
10928537
6.

The non-mevalonate pathway of isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis.

Hunter WN.

J Biol Chem. 2007 Jul 27;282(30):21573-7. Epub 2007 Apr 18. Review.

7.

The isoprenoid-precursor dependence of Plasmodium spp.

van der Meer JY, Hirsch AK.

Nat Prod Rep. 2012 Jul;29(7):721-8. doi: 10.1039/c2np20013a. Epub 2012 May 4. Review.

PMID:
22555616
8.

Metabolic plasticity for isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria.

Pérez-Gil J, Rodríguez-Concepción M.

Biochem J. 2013 May 15;452(1):19-25. doi: 10.1042/BJ20121899. Review.

PMID:
23614721
9.

Non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthesis: enzymes, genes and inhibitors.

Lichtenthaler HK.

Biochem Soc Trans. 2000 Dec;28(6):785-9. Review.

PMID:
11171208
12.

The MEP pathway: a new target for the development of herbicides, antibiotics and antimalarial drugs.

Rodríguez-Concepción M.

Curr Pharm Des. 2004;10(19):2391-400. Review.

PMID:
15279616
13.

Screening for mevalonate biosynthetic pathway inhibitors using sensitized bacterial strains.

Ferrand S, Tao J, Shen X, McGuire D, Schmid A, Glickman JF, Schopfer U.

J Biomol Screen. 2011 Jul;16(6):637-46. doi: 10.1177/1087057111403927. Epub 2011 May 18.

PMID:
21593486
14.

Isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacterial pathogens.

Heuston S, Begley M, Gahan CG, Hill C.

Microbiology. 2012 Jun;158(Pt 6):1389-401. doi: 10.1099/mic.0.051599-0. Epub 2012 Mar 30. Review.

PMID:
22466083
15.

An overview of the non-mevalonate pathway for terpenoid biosynthesis in plants.

Dubey VS, Bhalla R, Luthra R.

J Biosci. 2003 Sep;28(5):637-46. Review.

16.

HmgR, a key enzyme in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential for growth of Listeria monocytogenes EGDe.

Heuston S, Begley M, Davey MS, Eberl M, Casey PG, Hill C, Gahan CG.

Microbiology. 2012 Jul;158(Pt 7):1684-93. doi: 10.1099/mic.0.056069-0. Epub 2012 Apr 13.

PMID:
22504435
17.

Synthesis and characterization of cytidine derivatives that inhibit the kinase IspE of the non-mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis.

Crane CM, Hirsch AK, Alphey MS, Sgraja T, Lauw S, Illarionova V, Rohdich F, Eisenreich W, Hunter WN, Bacher A, Diederich F.

ChemMedChem. 2008 Jan;3(1):91-101.

PMID:
18033714
18.

A new alternative non-mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis in eubacteria and plants.

Paseshnichenko VA.

Biochemistry (Mosc). 1998 Feb;63(2):139-48. Review.

PMID:
9526105
19.

Isoprenoid biosynthesis as a novel target for antibacterial and antiparasitic drugs.

Rohmer M, Grosdemange-Billiard C, Seemann M, Tritsch D.

Curr Opin Investig Drugs. 2004 Feb;5(2):154-62. Review.

PMID:
15043389
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