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Phys Med Biol. 2006 Oct 21;51(20):5347-62. Epub 2006 Oct 3.

Rapid dual-injection single-scan 13N-ammonia PET for quantification of rest and stress myocardial blood flows.

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  • 1Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research, Department of Radiology and Department of Bioengineering, CAMT, 729 Arapeen Drive, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108-1218, USA.

Abstract

Quantification of myocardial blood flows at rest and stress using 13N-ammonia PET is an established method; however, current techniques require a waiting period of about 1 h between scans. The objective of this study was to test a rapid dual-injection single-scan approach, where 13N-ammonia injections are administered 10 min apart during rest and adenosine stress. Dynamic PET data were acquired in six human subjects using imaging protocols that provided separate single-injection scans as gold standards. Rest and stress data were combined to emulate rapid dual-injection data so that the underlying activity from each injection was known exactly. Regional blood flow estimates were computed from the dual-injection data using two methods: background subtraction and combined modelling. The rapid dual-injection approach provided blood flow estimates very similar to the conventional single-injection standards. Rest blood flow estimates were affected very little by the dual-injection approach, and stress estimates correlated strongly with separate single-injection values (r=0.998, mean absolute difference=0.06 ml min-1 g-1). An actual rapid dual-injection scan was successfully acquired in one subject and further demonstrates feasibility of the method. This study with a limited dataset demonstrates that blood flow quantification can be obtained in only 20 min by the rapid dual-injection approach with accuracy similar to that of conventional separate rest and stress scans. The rapid dual-injection approach merits further development and additional evaluation for potential clinical use.

PMID:
17019043
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2807405
Free PMC Article
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