Format
Items per page
Sort by

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 236

1.

Sugar-sweetened beverages and genetic risk of obesity.

Qi Q, Chu AY, Kang JH, Jensen MK, Curhan GC, Pasquale LR, Ridker PM, Hunter DJ, Willett WC, Rimm EB, Chasman DI, Hu FB, Qi L.

N Engl J Med. 2012 Oct 11;367(15):1387-96. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1203039. Epub 2012 Sep 21.

3.

Sugar-sweetened soft drink consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in two prospective cohorts.

Schernhammer ES, Hu FB, Giovannucci E, Michaud DS, Colditz GA, Stampfer MJ, Fuchs CS.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Sep;14(9):2098-105.

4.

Sugar-sweetened beverages, weight gain, and incidence of type 2 diabetes in young and middle-aged women.

Schulze MB, Manson JE, Ludwig DS, Colditz GA, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC, Hu FB.

JAMA. 2004 Aug 25;292(8):927-34.

PMID:
15328324
5.

A randomized trial of sugar-sweetened beverages and adolescent body weight.

Ebbeling CB, Feldman HA, Chomitz VR, Antonelli TA, Gortmaker SL, Osganian SK, Ludwig DS.

N Engl J Med. 2012 Oct 11;367(15):1407-16. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1203388. Epub 2012 Sep 21.

6.

A trial of sugar-free or sugar-sweetened beverages and body weight in children.

de Ruyter JC, Olthof MR, Seidell JC, Katan MB.

N Engl J Med. 2012 Oct 11;367(15):1397-406. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1203034. Epub 2012 Sep 21.

7.

Fried food consumption, genetic risk, and body mass index: gene-diet interaction analysis in three US cohort studies.

Qi Q, Chu AY, Kang JH, Huang J, Rose LM, Jensen MK, Liang L, Curhan GC, Pasquale LR, Wiggs JL, De Vivo I, Chan AT, Choi HK, Tamimi RM, Ridker PM, Hunter DJ, Willett WC, Rimm EB, Chasman DI, Hu FB, Qi L.

BMJ. 2014 Mar 19;348:g1610. doi: 10.1136/bmj.g1610.

8.

Changes in water and beverage intake and long-term weight changes: results from three prospective cohort studies.

Pan A, Malik VS, Hao T, Willett WC, Mozaffarian D, Hu FB.

Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Oct;37(10):1378-85. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2012.225. Epub 2013 Jan 15.

9.

Added sugar and sugar-sweetened foods and beverages and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study.

Bao Y, Stolzenberg-Solomon R, Jiao L, Silverman DT, Subar AF, Park Y, Leitzmann MF, Hollenbeck A, Schatzkin A, Michaud DS.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Aug;88(2):431-40.

10.

Sweets and sugar-sweetened soft drink intake in childhood in relation to adult BMI and overweight. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

Nissinen K, Mikkilä V, Männistö S, Lahti-Koski M, Räsänen L, Viikari J, Raitakari OT.

Public Health Nutr. 2009 Nov;12(11):2018-26. doi: 10.1017/S1368980009005849. Epub 2009 May 28.

PMID:
19476678
11.

Sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverage consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in men.

de Koning L, Malik VS, Rimm EB, Willett WC, Hu FB.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Jun;93(6):1321-7. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.110.007922. Epub 2011 Mar 23.

12.

Obesity and sugar-sweetened beverages in African-American preschool children: a longitudinal study.

Lim S, Zoellner JM, Lee JM, Burt BA, Sandretto AM, Sohn W, Ismail AI, Lepkowski JM.

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Jun;17(6):1262-8. doi: 10.1038/oby.2008.656. Epub 2009 Feb 5.

PMID:
19197261
13.

Association between commercial and traditional sugar-sweetened beverages and measures of adiposity in Costa Rica.

Rhee JJ, Mattei J, Campos H.

Public Health Nutr. 2012 Aug;15(8):1347-54. doi: 10.1017/S1368980012001000. Epub 2012 Apr 12.

14.

Dietary sugars and body weight: systematic review and meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials and cohort studies.

Te Morenga L, Mallard S, Mann J.

BMJ. 2012 Jan 15;346:e7492. doi: 10.1136/bmj.e7492. Review.

15.

Caffeinated and caffeine-free beverages and risk of type 2 diabetes.

Bhupathiraju SN, Pan A, Malik VS, Manson JE, Willett WC, van Dam RM, Hu FB.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;97(1):155-66. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.048603. Epub 2012 Nov 14.

16.

Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: a systematic review.

Malik VS, Schulze MB, Hu FB.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Aug;84(2):274-88. Review.

17.

Sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption correlates with BMI, waist circumference, and poor dietary choices in school children.

Collison KS, Zaidi MZ, Subhani SN, Al-Rubeaan K, Shoukri M, Al-Mohanna FA.

BMC Public Health. 2010 May 9;10:234. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-10-234.

18.

Sugar-sweetened beverages, genetic risk, and obesity.

Greenfield JR, Samaras K, Campbell LV.

N Engl J Med. 2013 Jan 17;368(3):285. doi: 10.1056/NEJMc1213563#SA1. No abstract available.

PMID:
23323908
19.

Sugar-sweetened beverages, genetic risk, and obesity.

Qi Q, Qi L.

N Engl J Med. 2013 Jan 17;368(3):286-7. doi: 10.1056/NEJMc1213563. No abstract available.

20.

Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cancer recurrence and survival in CALGB 89803 (Alliance).

Fuchs MA, Sato K, Niedzwiecki D, Ye X, Saltz LB, Mayer RJ, Mowat RB, Whittom R, Hantel A, Benson A, Atienza D, Messino M, Kindler H, Venook A, Ogino S, Wu K, Willett WC, Giovannucci EL, Meyerhardt JA.

PLoS One. 2014 Jun 17;9(6):e99816. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0099816. eCollection 2014.

Format
Items per page
Sort by

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Write to the Help Desk