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Results: 1 to 20 of 114

Related Citations for PubMed (Select 21562174)

1.

Tarantulas cling to smooth vertical surfaces by secreting silk from their feet.

Rind FC, Birkett CL, Duncan BJ, Ranken AJ.

J Exp Biol. 2011 Jun 1;214(Pt 11):1874-9. doi: 10.1242/jeb.055657.

2.

Tarantulas do not shoot silk from their legs: experimental evidence in four species of New World tarantulas.

Pérez-Miles F, Ortíz-Villatoro D.

J Exp Biol. 2012 May 15;215(Pt 10):1749-52. doi: 10.1242/jeb.069690.

3.

Biomaterials: silk-like secretion from tarantula feet.

Gorb SN, Niederegger S, Hayashi CY, Summers AP, Vötsch W, Walther P.

Nature. 2006 Sep 28;443(7110):407.

PMID:
17006505
4.

Silk secretion from tarantula feet revisited: alleged spigots are probably chemoreceptors.

Foelix RF, Rast B, Peattie AM.

J Exp Biol. 2012 Apr 1;215(Pt 7):1084-9. doi: 10.1242/jeb.066811.

5.

Silk production from tarantula feet questioned.

Pérez-Miles F, Panzera A, Ortiz-Villatoro D, Perdomo C.

Nature. 2009 Oct 22;461(7267):E9; discussion E9-10. doi: 10.1038/nature08404.

PMID:
19847209
6.

Alleged silk spigots on tarantula feet: electron microscopy reveals sensory innervation, no silk.

Foelix R, Erb B, Rast B.

Arthropod Struct Dev. 2013 May;42(3):209-17. doi: 10.1016/j.asd.2013.02.005. Epub 2013 Mar 7.

PMID:
23474440
7.

Friction and adhesion in the tarsal and metatarsal scopulae of spiders.

Niederegger S, Gorb SN.

J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol. 2006 Nov;192(11):1223-32. Epub 2006 Jul 25.

PMID:
16865371
8.

Fossil evidence for the origin of spider spinnerets, and a proposed arachnid order.

Selden PA, Shear WA, Sutton MD.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Dec 30;105(52):20781-5. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0809174106. Epub 2008 Dec 22.

9.

Arachnids secrete a fluid over their adhesive pads.

Peattie AM, Dirks JH, Henriques S, Federle W.

PLoS One. 2011;6(5):e20485. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0020485. Epub 2011 May 26.

10.

A devonian spinneret: early evidence of spiders and silk use.

Shear WA, Palmer JM, Coddington JA, Bonamo PM.

Science. 1989 Oct 27;246(4929):479-81.

PMID:
17788699
11.

Chemically mediated burrow recognition in the Mexican tarantula Brachypelma vagans female.

Dor A, Machkour-M'Rabet S, Legal L, Williams T, Hénaut Y.

Naturwissenschaften. 2008 Dec;95(12):1189-93. doi: 10.1007/s00114-008-0441-5. Epub 2008 Aug 19.

PMID:
18712335
12.
13.

Evolution of supercontraction in spider silk: structure-function relationship from tarantulas to orb-weavers.

Boutry C, Blackledge TA.

J Exp Biol. 2010 Oct 15;213(Pt 20):3505-14. doi: 10.1242/jeb.046110.

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17.

Cobweb-weaving spiders produce different attachment discs for locomotion and prey capture.

Sahni V, Harris J, Blackledge TA, Dhinojwala A.

Nat Commun. 2012;3:1106. doi: 10.1038/ncomms2099.

PMID:
23033082
18.

Adhesion measurements on the attachment devices of the jumping spider Evarcha arcuata.

Kesel AB, Martin A, Seidl T.

J Exp Biol. 2003 Aug;206(Pt 16):2733-8.

19.

Evolution of arthropod silks.

Craig CL.

Annu Rev Entomol. 1997;42:231-67.

PMID:
15012314
20.

Radial arrangement of Janus-like setae permits friction control in spiders.

Wolff JO, Gorb SN.

Sci Rep. 2013;3:1101. doi: 10.1038/srep01101. Epub 2013 Jan 22.

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