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Items: 1 to 20 of 538

1.

Global warming and flowering times in Thoreau's Concord: a community perspective.

Miller-Rushing AJ, Primack RB.

Ecology. 2008 Feb;89(2):332-41.

PMID:
18409423
2.

Phylogenetic patterns of species loss in Thoreau's woods are driven by climate change.

Willis CG, Ruhfel B, Primack RB, Miller-Rushing AJ, Davis CC.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Nov 4;105(44):17029-33. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0806446105. Epub 2008 Oct 27.

3.

Flowering phenology in a species-rich temperate grassland is sensitive to warming but not elevated CO2.

Hovenden MJ, Wills KE, Vander Schoor JK, Williams AL, Newton PC.

New Phytol. 2008;178(4):815-22. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2008.02419.x. Epub 2008 Mar 11.

4.

Favorable climate change response explains non-native species' success in Thoreau's woods.

Willis CG, Ruhfel BR, Primack RB, Miller-Rushing AJ, Losos JB, Davis CC.

PLoS One. 2010 Jan 26;5(1):e8878. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0008878.

5.
6.

Record-breaking early flowering in the eastern United States.

Ellwood ER, Temple SA, Primack RB, Bradley NL, Davis CC.

PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e53788. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0053788. Epub 2013 Jan 16.

7.
8.

Shifts in the flowering phenology of the northern Great Plains: patterns over 100 years.

Dunnell KL, Travers SE.

Am J Bot. 2011 Jun;98(6):935-45. doi: 10.3732/ajb.1000363. Epub 2011 May 24.

9.
10.

Climatic variability leads to later seasonal flowering of Floridian plants.

Von Holle B, Wei Y, Nickerson D.

PLoS One. 2010 Jul 21;5(7):e11500. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0011500.

11.

Evolution. Where have all Thoreau's flowers gone?

Pennisi E.

Science. 2008 Jul 4;321(5885):24-5. doi: 10.1126/science.321.5885.24b. No abstract available.

PMID:
18599747
12.

Flowering date of taxonomic families predicts phenological sensitivity to temperature: Implications for forecasting the effects of climate change on unstudied taxa.

Mazer SJ, Travers SE, Cook BI, Davies TJ, Bolmgren K, Kraft NJ, Salamin N, Inouye DW.

Am J Bot. 2013 Jul;100(7):1381-97. doi: 10.3732/ajb.1200455. Epub 2013 Jun 9.

13.

How does climate warming affect plant-pollinator interactions?

Hegland SJ, Nielsen A, Lázaro A, Bjerknes AL, Totland Ø.

Ecol Lett. 2009 Feb;12(2):184-95. doi: 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2008.01269.x. Epub 2008 Nov 26. Review.

PMID:
19049509
14.

Drivers of leaf-out phenology and their implications for species invasions: insights from Thoreau's Concord.

Polgar C, Gallinat A, Primack RB.

New Phytol. 2014 Apr;202(1):106-15. doi: 10.1111/nph.12647. Epub 2013 Dec 24. Erratum in: New Phytol. 2014 Jun;202(4):1413.

15.

Temperature-dependent shifts in phenology contribute to the success of exotic species with climate change.

Wolkovich EM, Davies TJ, Schaefer H, Cleland EE, Cook BI, Travers SE, Willis CG, Davis CC.

Am J Bot. 2013 Jul;100(7):1407-21.

16.

Herbarium specimens, photographs, and field observations show Philadelphia area plants are responding to climate change.

Panchen ZA, Primack RB, Anisko T, Lyons RE.

Am J Bot. 2012 Apr;99(4):751-6. doi: 10.3732/ajb.1100198. Epub 2012 Mar 23.

17.

Accelerating climate change impacts on alpine glacier forefield ecosystems in the European Alps.

Cannone N, Diolaiuti G, Guglielmin M, Smiraglia C.

Ecol Appl. 2008 Apr;18(3):637-48.

PMID:
18488623
18.

Risk of spring frost to apple production under future climate scenarios: the role of phenological acclimation.

Eccel E, Rea R, Caffarra A, Crisci A.

Int J Biometeorol. 2009 May;53(3):273-86. doi: 10.1007/s00484-009-0213-8. Epub 2009 Mar 5. Erratum in: Int J Biometeorol. 2009 Jul;53(4):375.

PMID:
19263089
19.

Reproductive and physiological responses to simulated climate warming for four subalpine species.

Lambrecht SC, Loik ME, Inouye DW, Harte J.

New Phytol. 2007;173(1):121-34.

20.

Rapid changes in flowering time in British plants.

Fitter AH, Fitter RS.

Science. 2002 May 31;296(5573):1689-91.

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