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Items: 1 to 20 of 216

1.

Brassica vegetables and cancer prevention. Epidemiology and mechanisms.

van Poppel G, Verhoeven DT, Verhagen H, Goldbohm RA.

Adv Exp Med Biol. 1999;472:159-68. Review.

PMID:
10736624
2.

Epidemiological studies on brassica vegetables and cancer risk.

Verhoeven DT, Goldbohm RA, van Poppel G, Verhagen H, van den Brandt PA.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Sep;5(9):733-48. Review.

3.

A review of mechanisms underlying anticarcinogenicity by brassica vegetables.

Verhoeven DT, Verhagen H, Goldbohm RA, van den Brandt PA, van Poppel G.

Chem Biol Interact. 1997 Feb 28;103(2):79-129. Review.

PMID:
9055870
4.

Glucosinolates in Brassica vegetables: the influence of the food supply chain on intake, bioavailability and human health.

Verkerk R, Schreiner M, Krumbein A, Ciska E, Holst B, Rowland I, De Schrijver R, Hansen M, Gerhäuser C, Mithen R, Dekker M.

Mol Nutr Food Res. 2009 Sep;53 Suppl 2:S219. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.200800065. Review.

PMID:
19035553
5.

Vegetables, fruit and phytoestrogens as preventive agents.

Potter JD, Steinmetz K.

IARC Sci Publ. 1996;(139):61-90. Review.

PMID:
8923020
6.

Effects of cruciferous vegetables and their constituents on drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the bioactivation of DNA-reactive dietary carcinogens.

Steinkellner H, Rabot S, Freywald C, Nobis E, Scharf G, Chabicovsky M, Knasmüller S, Kassie F.

Mutat Res. 2001 Sep 1;480-481:285-97. Review.

PMID:
11506821
7.

Effect of cooking brassica vegetables on the subsequent hydrolysis and metabolic fate of glucosinolates.

Rungapamestry V, Duncan AJ, Fuller Z, Ratcliffe B.

Proc Nutr Soc. 2007 Feb;66(1):69-81. Review.

PMID:
17343774
8.

Effect of storage, processing and cooking on glucosinolate content of Brassica vegetables.

Song L, Thornalley PJ.

Food Chem Toxicol. 2007 Feb;45(2):216-24. Epub 2006 Aug 30.

PMID:
17011103
9.

Broccoli sprouts: an exceptionally rich source of inducers of enzymes that protect against chemical carcinogens.

Fahey JW, Zhang Y, Talalay P.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1997 Sep 16;94(19):10367-72.

10.
11.

Human metabolism and excretion of cancer chemoprotective glucosinolates and isothiocyanates of cruciferous vegetables.

Shapiro TA, Fahey JW, Wade KL, Stephenson KK, Talalay P.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1998 Dec;7(12):1091-100.

14.

Effects of consumption of Brussels sprouts on intestinal and lymphocytic glutathione S-transferases in humans.

Nijhoff WA, Grubben MJ, Nagengast FM, Jansen JB, Verhagen H, van Poppel G, Peters WH.

Carcinogenesis. 1995 Sep;16(9):2125-8.

PMID:
7554064
15.

Bioactive organosulfur phytochemicals in Brassica oleracea vegetables--a review.

Stoewsand GS.

Food Chem Toxicol. 1995 Jun;33(6):537-43. Review.

PMID:
7797181
16.

Cruciferous vegetables: cancer protective mechanisms of glucosinolate hydrolysis products and selenium.

Keck AS, Finley JW.

Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):5-12. Review.

PMID:
15035868
17.

Vegetables, fruit, and cancer prevention: a review.

Steinmetz KA, Potter JD.

J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Oct;96(10):1027-39. Review.

PMID:
8841165
18.

Chemoprotective glucosinolates and isothiocyanates of broccoli sprouts: metabolism and excretion in humans.

Shapiro TA, Fahey JW, Wade KL, Stephenson KK, Talalay P.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 May;10(5):501-8.

19.

Dietary constituents of broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables: implications for prevention and therapy of cancer.

Herr I, Büchler MW.

Cancer Treat Rev. 2010 Aug;36(5):377-83. doi: 10.1016/j.ctrv.2010.01.002. Epub 2010 Feb 20. Review.

PMID:
20172656
20.
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