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Results: 1 to 20 of 405

1.

N-acetyltransferase 1 genetic polymorphism, cigarette smoking, well-done meat intake, and breast cancer risk.

Zheng W, Deitz AC, Campbell DR, Wen WQ, Cerhan JR, Sellers TA, Folsom AR, Hein DW.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1999 Mar;8(3):233-9.

PMID:
10090301
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
2.

Sulfotransferase 1A1 polymorphism, endogenous estrogen exposure, well-done meat intake, and breast cancer risk.

Zheng W, Xie D, Cerhan JR, Sellers TA, Wen W, Folsom AR.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Feb;10(2):89-94.

PMID:
11219777
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
3.

N-Acetyltransferase-2 genetic polymorphism, well-done meat intake, and breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women.

Deitz AC, Zheng W, Leff MA, Gross M, Wen WQ, Doll MA, Xiao GH, Folsom AR, Hein DW.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2000 Sep;9(9):905-10.

PMID:
11008907
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
4.

Effect of NAT1 and NAT2 genetic polymorphisms on colorectal cancer risk associated with exposure to tobacco smoke and meat consumption.

Lilla C, Verla-Tebit E, Risch A, Jäger B, Hoffmeister M, Brenner H, Chang-Claude J.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Jan;15(1):99-107.

PMID:
16434594
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
5.

Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) and 2 (NAT2) polymorphisms in susceptibility to bladder cancer: the influence of smoking.

Okkels H, Sigsgaard T, Wolf H, Autrup H.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1997 Apr;6(4):225-31.

PMID:
9107426
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
6.

A pilot study testing the association between N-acetyltransferases 1 and 2 and risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma in Japanese people.

Katoh T, Kaneko S, Boissy R, Watson M, Ikemura K, Bell DA.

Carcinogenesis. 1998 Oct;19(10):1803-7.

PMID:
9806162
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
7.

Genetic polymorphisms in heterocyclic amine metabolism and risk of colorectal adenomas.

Ishibe N, Sinha R, Hein DW, Kulldorff M, Strickland P, Fretland AJ, Chow WH, Kadlubar FF, Lang NP, Rothman N.

Pharmacogenetics. 2002 Mar;12(2):145-50.

PMID:
11875368
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
8.

A prospective study of N-acetyltransferase genotype, red meat intake, and risk of colorectal cancer.

Chen J, Stampfer MJ, Hough HL, Garcia-Closas M, Willett WC, Hennekens CH, Kelsey KT, Hunter DJ.

Cancer Res. 1998 Aug 1;58(15):3307-11.

PMID:
9699660
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
9.

Well-done meat intake and the risk of breast cancer.

Zheng W, Gustafson DR, Sinha R, Cerhan JR, Moore D, Hong CP, Anderson KE, Kushi LH, Sellers TA, Folsom AR.

J Natl Cancer Inst. 1998 Nov 18;90(22):1724-9.

PMID:
9827527
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
10.

NAT2 slow acetylation and GSTM1 null genotypes may increase postmenopausal breast cancer risk in long-term smoking women.

van der Hel OL, Peeters PH, Hein DW, Doll MA, Grobbee DE, Kromhout D, Bueno de Mesquita HB.

Pharmacogenetics. 2003 Jul;13(7):399-407.

PMID:
12835615
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
11.

NAT1*10 and NAT1*11 polymorphisms and breast cancer risk.

Millikan RC.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2000 Feb;9(2):217-9.

PMID:
10698485
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
12.

Association of the NAT1*10 genotype with increased chromosome aberrations and higher lung cancer risk in cigarette smokers.

Abdel-Rahman SZ, El-Zein RA, Zwischenberger JB, Au WW.

Mutat Res. 1998 Feb 26;398(1-2):43-54.

PMID:
9626964
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
13.

N-acetyl transferase 2 genotypes, meat intake and breast cancer risk.

Gertig DM, Hankinson SE, Hough H, Spiegelman D, Colditz GA, Willett WC, Kelsey KT, Hunter DJ.

Int J Cancer. 1999 Jan 5;80(1):13-7.

PMID:
9935222
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
14.

Effects of N-acetyl transferase 1 and 2 polymorphisms on bladder cancer risk in Caucasians.

Gu J, Liang D, Wang Y, Lu C, Wu X.

Mutat Res. 2005 Mar 7;581(1-2):97-104. Epub 2004 Dec 16.

PMID:
15725609
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
15.

Combined effects of well-done red meat, smoking, and rapid N-acetyltransferase 2 and CYP1A2 phenotypes in increasing colorectal cancer risk.

Le Marchand L, Hankin JH, Wilkens LR, Pierce LM, Franke A, Kolonel LN, Seifried A, Custer LJ, Chang W, Lum-Jones A, Donlon T.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Dec;10(12):1259-66.

PMID:
11751443
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
16.

Meat consumption, N-acetyl transferase 1 and 2 polymorphism and risk of breast cancer in Danish postmenopausal women.

Egeberg R, Olsen A, Autrup H, Christensen J, Stripp C, Tetens I, Overvad K, Tjønneland A.

Eur J Cancer Prev. 2008 Feb;17(1):39-47.

PMID:
18090909
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
17.

Meat consumption, cigarette smoking, and genetic susceptibility in the etiology of colorectal cancer: results from a Dutch prospective study.

Tiemersma EW, Kampman E, Bueno de Mesquita HB, Bunschoten A, van Schothorst EM, Kok FJ, Kromhout D.

Cancer Causes Control. 2002 May;13(4):383-93.

PMID:
12074508
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
18.

Cigarette smoking, N-acetyltransferases 1 and 2, and breast cancer risk.

Millikan RC, Pittman GS, Newman B, Tse CK, Selmin O, Rockhill B, Savitz D, Moorman PG, Bell DA.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1998 May;7(5):371-8.

PMID:
9610785
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free Article
19.

A cytochrome P4502E1 genetic polymorphism and tobacco smoking in breast cancer.

Shields PG, Ambrosone CB, Graham S, Bowman ED, Harrington AM, Gillenwater KA, Marshall JR, Vena JE, Laughlin R, Nemoto T, Freudenheim JL.

Mol Carcinog. 1996 Nov;17(3):144-50.

PMID:
8944074
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
20.

Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer in French-Canadians: role of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and gene-environment interactions.

Krajinovic M, Ghadirian P, Richer C, Sinnett H, Gandini S, Perret C, Lacroix A, Labuda D, Sinnett D.

Int J Cancer. 2001 Apr 15;92(2):220-5.

PMID:
11291049
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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