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J Exp Med. 1937 Jan 1;65(1):127-46.

VITAMIN C THERAPY AND PROPHYLAXIS IN EXPERIMENTAL POLIOMYELITIS.

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  • 1Department of Bacteriology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York.

Abstract

1. A group of 34 monkeys were infected intracerebrally with 0.1 cc. of a 10 per cent virus suspension. Following infection, 9 animals were treated with daily injections of 700 to 100 mg., 16 with 50 to 10 mg. and 9 with 5 mg. of vitamin C for a period of 2 weeks. In the whole group there were 6 animals that survived without showing any evidence of paralysis. 2 of these had received 50 to 10 mg. while 4 had received 5 mg. All of 19 untreated control monkeys, infected simultaneously with the same amount of virus, developed paralysis. 2. Another group of 6 monkeys were infected intracerebrally with 0.05 cc. of virus. Following infection, one animal was treated in the same manner with 25 mg. and 5 with 5 mg. of vitamin C. In the whole group there was one animal that survived without showing any evidence of paralysis. This animal had received 5 mg. All of 7 untreated control monkeys, infected simultaneously with the same amount of virus, developed paralysis. 3. A third group of 22 monkeys were infected intracerebrally with 0.01 cc. of virus. Following infection, one animal was treated in the same manner with 100 mg., 2 with 50 to 10 mg., and 19 with 5 mg. of vitamin C. In the whole group there were 12 animals that survived without showing any evidence of paralysis. One of these had received 10 mg., while 11 had received 5 mg. Of 12 untreated control monkeys, infected simultaneously with the same amount of virus, 2 failed to show any paralytic symptoms and 10 developed paralysis. 4. A summary of the results obtained in all three groups shows: (a) that among a total of 62 treated monkeys, 19 survived without paralysis and 43 succumbed to the disease, while of a total of 38 untreated controls, only 2 failed to develop paralysis and 36 succumbed to the disease; (b) that treatment with large doses of vitamin C was without any beneficial effect (all 10 monkeys which had received 700 to 100 mg. developing paralysis, that the administration of intermediate doses was followed by occasional survival without paralysis of the treated animal (3 monkeys surviving of a total of 19 which had received 50 to 10 mg.), and that nearly one-half of the animals which had received small doses escaped the disease (16 monkeys surviving of a total of 33 which had received 5 mg.). 5. Attempts to protect monkeys against subsequent intracerebral infection by the prophylactic administration of vitamin C, either per os or parenterally, have produced negative results. 6. The pathogenesis of infantile paralysis is discussed in the light of the experimental findings and the possibility is suggested that vitamin C represents one of the deficiency factors in the susceptibility problem of the human disease.

PMID:
19870585
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC2133474
Free PMC Article
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