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Items: 18

1.

Evolution of Evidence for Selected Nutrient and Disease Relationships.

Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on Examination of the Evolving Science for Dietary Supplements.

Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2002.

2.

Risk Assessment in the Federal Government: Managing the Process.

National Research Council (US) Committee on the Institutional Means for Assessment of Risks to Public Health.

Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 1983.

3.

Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline.

Institute of Medicine (US) Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes and its Panel on Folate, Other B Vitamins, and Choline.

Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 1998.

4.

Correlates of beverage intake in adolescent girls: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study.

Striegel-Moore RH, Thompson D, Affenito SG, Franko DL, Obarzanek E, Barton BA, Schreiber GB, Daniels SR, Schmidt M, Crawford PB.

J Pediatr. 2006 Feb;148(2):183-7.

PMID:
16492426
5.

Science-based micronutrient fortification: which nutrients, how much, and how to know?

Rosenberg IH.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Aug;82(2):279-80. No abstract available.

6.

Overweight among low-income preschool children associated with the consumption of sweet drinks: Missouri, 1999-2002.

Welsh JA, Cogswell ME, Rogers S, Rockett H, Mei Z, Grummer-Strawn LM.

Pediatrics. 2005 Feb;115(2):e223-9.

PMID:
15687430
7.

Sugar-added beverages and adolescent weight change.

Berkey CS, Rockett HR, Field AE, Gillman MW, Colditz GA.

Obes Res. 2004 May;12(5):778-88.

8.

Energy-dense snack food intake in adolescence: longitudinal relationship to weight and fatness.

Phillips SM, Bandini LG, Naumova EN, Cyr H, Colclough S, Dietz WH, Must A.

Obes Res. 2004 Mar;12(3):461-72.

9.

Using intake biomarkers to evaluate the extent of dietary misreporting in a large sample of adults: the OPEN study.

Subar AF, Kipnis V, Troiano RP, Midthune D, Schoeller DA, Bingham S, Sharbaugh CO, Trabulsi J, Runswick S, Ballard-Barbash R, Sunshine J, Schatzkin A.

Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Jul 1;158(1):1-13.

10.

Dietary reference intakes for energy, carbohydrate, fiber, fat, fatty acids, cholesterol, protein and amino acids.

Trumbo P, Schlicker S, Yates AA, Poos M; Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine, The National Academies.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2002 Nov;102(11):1621-30. No abstract available. Erratum in: J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 May;103(5):563.

PMID:
12449285
11.

Does physical activity prevent weight gain--a systematic review.

Fogelholm M, Kukkonen-Harjula K.

Obes Rev. 2000 Oct;1(2):95-111. Review.

PMID:
12119991
12.

Dietary reference intakes: vitamin A, vitamin K, arsenic, boron, chromium, copper, iodine, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, silicon, vanadium, and zinc.

Trumbo P, Yates AA, Schlicker S, Poos M.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2001 Mar;101(3):294-301. No abstract available.

PMID:
11269606
13.

Relation between consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks and childhood obesity: a prospective, observational analysis.

Ludwig DS, Peterson KE, Gortmaker SL.

Lancet. 2001 Feb 17;357(9255):505-8.

PMID:
11229668
14.
15.

Summary of a scientific conference on preventive nutrition: pediatrics to geriatrics.

Deckelbaum RJ, Fisher EA, Winston M, Kumanyika S, Lauer RM, Pi-Sunyer FX, St Jeor S, Schaefer EJ, Weinstein IB.

Circulation. 1999 Jul 27;100(4):450-6. No abstract available.

16.
17.

Effect of sedentary activities on resting metabolic rate.

Dietz WH, Bandini LG, Morelli JA, Peers KF, Ching PL.

Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Mar;59(3):556-9.

PMID:
8116530
18.

Energy expenditure in obese and nonobese adolescents.

Bandini LG, Schoeller DA, Dietz WH.

Pediatr Res. 1990 Feb;27(2):198-203.

PMID:
2314950
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