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J Exp Med. 1999 Feb 15;189(4):673-82.

Augmentation of antigen receptor-mediated responses by histamine H1 receptor signaling.

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  • 1Department of Molecular Immunology, Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan.

Abstract

Histamine is considered one of the important mediators of immediate hypersensitivity and inflammation, and acts via G protein-coupled receptors. Here, we report that histamine may affect antigen receptor-mediated immune responses of T and B cells via a signal(s) from histamine H1 receptors (H1Rs). Histamine exhibited enhancing effects on the in vitro proliferative responses of anti-CD3epsilon- or anti-IgM-stimulated spleen T and B cells, respectively, at the culture condition that the fetal calf serum was dialyzed before culture and c-kit-positive cells were depleted from the spleen cells. In studies of histamine H1R knockout mice, H1R-deficient T cells had low proliferative responses to anti-CD3epsilon cross-linking or antigen stimulation in vitro. B cells from H1R-deficient mice were also affected, demonstrating low proliferative responses to B cell receptor cross-linking. Antibody production against trinitrophenyl-Ficoll was reduced in H1R-deficient mice. Other aspects of T and B cell function were normal in the H1R knockout mice. H1R-deficient T and B cells showed normal responses upon stimulation with interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, CD40 ligand, CD40 ligand plus IL-4, and lipopolysaccharide. Collectively, these results imply that the signal generated by histamine through H1R augments antigen receptor-mediated immune responses, suggesting cross-talk between G protein-coupled receptors and antigen receptor-mediated signaling.

PMID:
9989982
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2192933
Free PMC Article

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