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Pediatr Surg Int. 1998 Dec;14(3):163-7.

The clinical implications of non-idiopathic intussusception.

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  • 1Department of Paediatric Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, Private Bag 4710, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Abstract

A pathological lesion can be identified at the leadpoint of intussusception in about 6% of episodes. Occasionally, general manifestations of an underlying disease indicate the specific cause of an intussusception (e.g., perioral pigmentation in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome), but usually the clinical features provide no clues as to the aetiology. Neonatal intussusception may be caused by a duplication cyst or Meckel's diverticulum. Beyond 12 months, the proportion of intussusceptions due to a pathological lesion at the leadpoint increases with age. There is an identifiable lesion in the majority of children over 5 years of age. Postoperative intussusception accounts for between 0.5% and 16% of intussusceptions, although it has a variety of causes; it typically follows retroperitoneal dissection. It is unusual for an intussusception due to a pathological lesion at the leadpoint to be reduced by enema. If it is reduced, the lesion may be seen at the time of reduction or fluoroscopy, or subsequently on ultrasonography.

PMID:
9880737
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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