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Am J Surg. 1998 Nov;176(5):428-9.

Low prevalence of human papillomavirus in a geographic region with a high incidence of head and neck cancer.

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  • 1Head and Neck Surgery Department, Hospital A. C. Camargo, Fundação Antonio Prudente, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The main purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in patients with head and neck carcinomas from Brazil.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Forty-five patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma were included in the study, from 1995 to 1996. Forty-two were male and 3 female, with age ranging from 32 to 82 years (median 61). Five patients (11%) did not have previous history of use of tobacco and 38 (90.5%) were heavy smokers. Tumor sites were pyriform sinus, 10; tongue, 11 (oral, 6; base, 5); larynx, 7; floor of mouth, 3; tonsil, 6; retromolar area, 3; inferior gingiva 2; buccal mucosa, 2; and maxillary sinus in 1 patient. Twenty-five were stage IV, 17 stage III, and 3 stage II.

RESULTS:

The presence of HPV DNA was detected in 5 of 45 patients (11%), all of them with HPV 16. Two patients had HPV DNA in normal mucosa and tumor tissue, 1 patient had HPV DNA only in the normal mucosa and tumor tissue, 1 patient had HPV DNA only in the normal mucosa, and 2 patients were positive for HPV DNA in tumor tissue. Four patients were male and 1 was female; 2 patients were nonsmokers. Three patients had tonsil carcinoma, 1 patient had a tongue carcinoma, and 1 patient had a pyriform sinus cancer.

CONCLUSIONS:

The role of chemical carcinogens seems to be more important in the genesis of head and neck cancer than is HPV infection. The presence of HPV DNA in 5 of 45 patients stimulates further investigation to determine the role of HPV as a risk factor for head and neck carcinoma.

PMID:
9874427
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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