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J Cell Biol. 1998 Dec 14;143(6):1713-23.

Roles for laminin in embryogenesis: exencephaly, syndactyly, and placentopathy in mice lacking the laminin alpha5 chain.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Renal Division, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

Abstract

Laminins are the major noncollagenous glycoproteins of all basal laminae (BLs). They are alpha/beta/gamma heterotrimers assembled from 10 known chains, and they subserve both structural and signaling roles. Previously described mutations in laminin chain genes result in diverse disorders that are manifested postnatally and therefore provide little insight into laminin's roles in embryonic development. Here, we show that the laminin alpha5 chain is required during embryogenesis. The alpha5 chain is present in virtually all BLs of early somite stage embryos and then becomes restricted to specific BLs as development proceeds, including those of the surface ectoderm and placental vasculature. BLs that lose alpha5 retain or acquire other alpha chains. Embryos lacking laminin alpha5 die late in embryogenesis. They exhibit multiple developmental defects, including failure of anterior neural tube closure (exencephaly), failure of digit septation (syndactyly), and dysmorphogenesis of the placental labyrinth. These defects are all attributable to defects in BLs that are alpha5 positive in controls and that appear ultrastructurally abnormal in its absence. Other laminin alpha chains accumulate in these BLs, but this compensation is apparently functionally inadequate. Our results identify new roles for laminins and BLs in diverse developmental processes.

PMID:
9852162
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2132973
Free PMC Article

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