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Am J Clin Nutr. 1998 Dec;68(6 Suppl):1375S-1379S.

Soy protein and isoflavones: their effects on blood lipids and bone density in postmenopausal women.

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  • 1Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA. spotter@protein.com

Abstract

The effects of soy protein (40 g/d) containing moderate and higher concentrations of isoflavones on blood lipid profiles, mononuclear cell LDL receptor messenger RNA, and bone mineral density and content were investigated in 66 free-living, hypercholesterolemic, postmenopausal women during a 6-mo, parallel-group, double-blind trial with 3 interventions. After a control period of 14 d, during which subjects followed a National Cholesterol Education Program Step I low-fat, low-cholesterol diet, all subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary groups: Step I diet with 40 g protein/d obtained from casein and nonfat dry milk (CNFDM), Step I diet with 40 g protein/d from isolated soy protein containing 1.39 mg isoflavones/g protein (ISP56), or Step I diet with 40 g protein/d from isolated soy protein containing 2.25 mg isoflavones/g protein (ISP90). Total and regional bone mineral content and density were assessed. Non-HDL cholesterol for both ISP56 and ISP90 groups was reduced compared with the CNFDM group (P < 0.05). HDL cholesterol increased in both ISP56 and ISP90 groups (P < 0.05). Mononuclear cell LDL receptor mRNA was increased in subjects consuming ISP56 or ISP90 compared with those consuming CNFDM (P < 0.05). Significant increases occurred in both bone mineral content and density in the lumbar spine but not elsewhere for the ISP90 group compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Intake of soy protein at both isoflavone concentrations for 6 mo may decrease the risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. However, only the higher isoflavone-containing product protected against spinal bone loss.

PMID:
9848502
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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