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Eur J Cancer Prev. 1998 Aug;7(4):305-13.

A survey of human papillomavirus 16 antibodies in patients with epithelial cancers.

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  • 1National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD 20852, USA.

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly HPV 16, is linked to the development of cervical cancer. However, the role of HPV 16 in a number of extra-cervical epithelial tumours is controversial. To assess exposure to HPV 16 in patients with different cancers, we conducted a large serosurvey of 905 patients with 21 types of tumours and measured IgG to HPV 16 virus-like particles (VLPs) using a well characterized enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Patients with cervical cancer were considered 'positive controls', as about half were expected to be specifically HPV 16-related. A non-cancer study group consisting of 48 patients with endocrine disorders (eg diabetes) was also tested. HPV 16 antibody prevalence was highest in patients with cancers of the cervix (52% +/- 7%), vulva (27% +/- 9%), vagina (27% +/- 13%) and penis (63% +/- 16%). Seroprevalence was much lower in the non-cancer group (4% +/- 3%) and all other cancer patients: uterus (9% +/- 4%); ovary (4% +/- 3%); testis (5% +/- 4%); prostate (6% +/- 4%); squamous carcinoma (6% +/- 3%) and adenocarcinoma (4% +/- 3%) of the lung; rectum (2% +/- 2%); pancreas (8% +/- 4%); colon (2% +/- 2%); stomach (0%); oesophagus (8% +/- 4%); buccal cavity (12% +/- 5%); breast (10% +/- 4%); non-melanomatous (9% +/- 6%) and melanomatous (6% +/- 3%) skin tumours; bladder (8% +/- 4%); and kidney (2% +/- 2%). The results confirm the strong relation of HPV with several lower anogenital tract tumours, but, at least in this population, fail to identify additional epithelial tumours associated with high seroprevalence of HPV 16 VLP antibodies.

PMID:
9806119
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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