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Intensive Care Med. 1998 Sep;24(9):946-52.

Ventilatory care in a selection of Ontario hospitals: bigger is not necessarily better! Critical Care Research Network (CCR-Net).

Author information

  • 1Richard Ivey Critical Care Trauma Center, Victoria Hospital London, Ontario, Canada. skeenan42@hotmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether there is variability in the structure and process of ventilatory care in intensive care units (ICUs) of the hospitals of Southwestern Ontario.

DESIGN:

Self-administered questionnaire-based survey.

SETTING:

ICUs of selected community and teaching hospitals of Southwestern Ontario.

PARTICIPANTS:

Head of respiratory therapy service of respective hospitals; in those hospitals without respiratory therapists, the ICU nurse manager.

INTERVENTION:

Self-administered questionnaire.

OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

The availability of different models of ventilators and respiratory therapist and physician coverage were assessed. In addition, the use of clinical practice guidelines, respiratory therapists, and the nursing role in ventilatory care were determined.

RESULTS:

In general, the structure of ventilatory care, including availability of different modes of ventilation, and coverage by respiratory therapists and physicians was more comprehensive in larger hospitals. However, the availability of some modes of ventilation varied more than expected among hospitals of comparable size. Similarly, variability in the process of ventilatory care, defined by the availability of clinical practice guidelines and the roles of respiratory therapists varied both within and among hospitals of different size.

CONCLUSIONS:

The structure and process of ventilatory care in this sample of Southwestern Ontario ICUs was found to be variable. Not all this variability could be accounted for by hospital size, suggesting a potential for improvement in overall ventilatory care. Further study is required before any specific recommendations can be considered.

PMID:
9803331
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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