Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1998 Oct 13;95(21):12544-9.

Neuropeptides, by direct interaction with T cells, induce cytokine secretion and break the commitment to a distinct T helper phenotype.

Author information

  • 1Department of Immunology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel.

Abstract

Searching for nervous system candidates that could directly induce T cell cytokine secretion, I tested four neuropeptides (NPs): somatostatin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, neuropeptide Y, and substance P. Comparing neuropeptide-driven versus classical antigen-driven cytokine secretion from T helper cells Th0, Th1, and Th2 autoimmune-related T cell populations, I show that the tested NPs, in the absence of any additional factors, directly induce a marked secretion of cytokines [interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma, IL-4, and IL-10) from T cells. Furthermore, NPs drive distinct Th1 and Th2 populations to a "forbidden" cytokine secretion: secretion of Th2 cytokines from a Th1 T cell line and vice versa. Such a phenomenon cannot be induced by classical antigenic stimulation. My study suggests that the nervous system, through NPs interacting with their specific T cell-expressed receptors, can lead to the secretion of both typical and atypical cytokines, to the breakdown of the commitment to a distinct Th phenotype, and a potentially altered function and destiny of T cells in vivo.

PMID:
9770522
PMCID:
PMC22867
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk