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Urology. 1998 Oct;52(4):584-90.

Partial nephrectomy: alternative treatment for selected patients with renal cell carcinoma.

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To analyze the experience and the results of partial nephrectomy in a single institution over the last 10 years in order to optimize patient selection and minimize morbidity.

METHODS:

This is a retrospective chart review of 64 patients (mean age 56.6 years, range 18 to 88; 43 men, 21 women) who underwent 66 partial nephrectomies at the Brigham and Women's Hospital between 1987 and 1997. Preoperatively, 62% of the patients had no symptoms, whereas 38% had pain and/or hematuria. The indications were elective in 23 patients, solitary kidney in 28 (14 with bilateral asynchronous tumor), bilateral synchronous tumor in 7, von Hippel-Lindau disease with normal contralateral kidney in 3, lymphoma in 3, and other indications in 2 patients. Surgery was performed for solid or indeterminate renal mass suspected of being renal cell carcinoma in 58 patients.

RESULTS:

The most common final pathologic diagnosis was renal cell carcinoma in 47 procedures. One or more complications occurred after 18 procedures (15 with solitary kidney and 3 in patients with normal contralateral kidney) or 27% of the patients. The most common complication was an increased creatinine level (two times the baseline), occurring in 10 procedures (15.1%). Transfusion was necessary in 37 of 66 procedures (56%), and the mean blood loss was 836 cc (range 100 to 3200). Regarding renal function, 85% of the patients had a minimal increase in creatinine of less than 0.5 mg/dL after surgery (all patients with a normal contralateral kidney are in this group); 3 patients required either temporary (n = 1) or permanent (n = 2) dialysis. Other complications are also described. The mean length of stay among 65 patients was 6.5 days (range 3 to 14). The differences between length of stay, blood loss, and tumor size were statistically significant between the solitary kidney group and the elective indications group (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Nephron sparing surgery is feasible and relatively safe in patients with a normal contralateral kidney. Awareness of potential complications should aid in the selection of appropriate patients for this procedure.

PMID:
9763075
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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