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Horm Metab Res. 1998 Aug;30(8):504-8.

Comparison of the effects of simmondsin and cholecystokinin on metabolism, brown adipose tissue and the pancreas in food-restricted rats.

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  • 1Interdisciplinary Research Centre, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Campus Kortrijk, Belgium.

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the analogies between the physiological effects of simmondsin, a satiety-inducing glycoside extracted from jojoba seeds, and the gastro-intestinal satiation peptide, cholecystokinin. The effects of intraperitoneal injection of the biological active CCK-octapeptide on the pancreas, interscapular brown adipose tissue, growth performance and energy metabolism in normal-fed, severely food intake-restricted (50 % of normal food intake) or moderately food intake-restricted (65 % of normal food intake) growing rats were compared to the effects of 0.25 % simmondsin mixed in the food, inducing moderate food intake reduction (65 % of normal) in rats. Cholecystokinin induced pancreatic hypertrophy. In normal fed rats, cholecystokinin had no effect on brown adipose tissue or growth, while, in severely food intake-restricted rats, it caused brown adipose tissue hypertrophy and reduced growth. In moderately food intake-restricted rats, both cholecystokinin and simmondsin induced pancreatic hypertrophy, increased brown adipose weight and metabolism and caused a slight decrease in growth. We conclude that cholecystokinin may decrease growth performance in fast growing severely food intake-restricted rats by stimulating brown adipose tissue metabolism, probably because of protein shortage induced by pancreatic hyperstimulation. Simmondsin has similar effects. These results support the hypothesis that endogenous cholecystokinin is involved in the effects of simmondsin in rats.

PMID:
9761380
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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