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J Neurosurg. 1998 Oct;89(4):559-67.

Detection of soluble E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and L-selectin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

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  • 1Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, USA.

Abstract

OBJECT:

The goal of this study was to explore whether the levels of soluble adhesion molecules were elevated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This association was suggested by the known inflammatory response in vasospasm and the role of vascular adhesion molecules in regulating leukocytic adhesion to, and migration across, vascular endothelium.

METHODS:

A prospective analysis was performed on CSF samples obtained in 17 patients who had suffered a recent aneurysmal SAH and in 16 control patients by using quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and L-selectin. Levels of soluble forms of E-selectin (p=0.0013), ICAM-1 (p=0.0001), and VCAM-1 (p=0.048) were found to be elevated in the CSF of patients after SAH compared with levels in the CSF of norminal controls, patients with unruptured aneurysms, and patients tested months after SAH occurred. In addition, individual patients tested at the time of their initial ictus demonstrated a fall in adhesion molecule levels over time. Levels of E-selectin (p=0.044) were highest in patients who later developed moderate or severe vasospasm.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adhesion molecules are known to be involved in white cell adherence to the endothelium and subsequent diapedesis and migration in which a role in initiation of tissue damage is postulated. The authors have demonstrated the elevation of three adhesion molecules, with severely elevated levels of E-selectin seen in patients who later develop vasospasm. A correlation with a role of vascular adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm is suggested.

PMID:
9761049
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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