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Am J Clin Nutr. 1998 Sep;68(3):623-9.

Serum retinol concentrations in children are affected by food sources of beta-carotene, fat intake, and anthelmintic drug treatment.

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  • 1Cornell University, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.

Abstract

The provision of vitamin A in food sources of beta-carotene is an alternative to the distribution of high-dose capsules. To examine factors that may influence the success of food-based programs, a study was carried out in Sumatra, Indonesia, of the effect of food sources of beta-carotene, extra dietary fat, and Ascaris lumbricoides infection on serum retinol concentrations in children. Meals and snacks with various amounts of beta-carotene and fat were fed at midday to children 3-6 y of age for 3 wk. Some groups of children were dewormed with the anthelmintic levamisole before the feeding period, whereas others remained infected. Results showed that the incorporation of beta-carotene sources (mainly in the form of red sweet potatoes) into the meal significantly increased serum retinol concentrations. The greatest rise in serum retinol occurred when meals contained added beta-carotene sources and added fat and the children were dewormed. Adding more fat to the meal and deworming the children caused a rise in serum retinol similar to that seen when feeding additional beta-carotene sources. Moreover, the effects of fat and deworming together were additive to the effects of additional beta-carotene sources. When the meal contained additional beta-carotene sources, added fat caused a further improvement in serum retinol concentrations but only if A. lumbricoides infection was low. These studies indicated that food-based interventions in vitamin A-deficient areas might be successful and that other interventions such as increasing dietary fat concentrations and anthelmintic treatment should be considered along with increasing consumption of beta-carotene-rich food.

PMID:
9734739
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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